The Weathering Magazine Issue 7 - Snow-Ice - superunitedkingdom

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World wide shipping cost included THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION Contact [email protected]

Mig Jimenez

F

or years, modelers have been fascinated by the effects of snow and ice; from a light frost to impassible snow drifts. It doesn’t matter whether

a modeler lives in Texas or in Okinawa, or even if the modeler has never seen or touched real snow. We are all fascinated by this natural effect that changes the landscape, covering everything in a blanket of white. In addition, snow is almost always accompanied by ice, mud, moisture and water. But, for many years, representing snow and ice has been a great challenge for us all. It is not always easy to make snow as we risk disaster, creating some type of cream pie or some other undesired outcome instead of a realistic snowfield. However, painting and weathering vehicles, aircraft, boats, robots or civilian vehicles in an environment of snow can elevate our creations to another world. We model using camouflage paint, baking powders, commercial snow effects and glossy enamels; we continually try new materials and techniques to bring the feeling of cold to our creations. We must ask; what is our attraction to this difficult environment? Perhaps it is simply because it is an extreme environment. Machines and men have reached their limit in these cold places; on the Eastern Front, the North and South Poles and in many of our countries and hometowns during a harsh winter. So, again we bring together some of the best modelers in the world with some very original models to answer the previous question. We hope that after reading this issue you may find out why we are so attracted to snow and ice.

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE by AMMO of Mig Jimenez Copyright 2014

Chief Editor Rick Lawler

Layout Antonio Alonso

Original idea Art director Mig Jiménez

Article Assistant Iain Hamilton

Editorial Management Carlos Cuesta Financial Manager Pere Valls Cover Mig Jiménez

Akatsiya Photographer José Irún Styling & Community Manager Elizabeth Wiese Akatsiya Cristiana Xtiana

Collaborators Sergiusz Peczek Jamie Haggo Jean-Benard Andre Alex Clark Rick Lawler Aitor Azcue Diego Quijano Gunther Steinberger Kevin Derken Clay Kemp John F. Steinman Jeff Meyer Rodrigo Hernández Domingo Hernández Rubén Torregrosa

www.theweatheringmagazine.com [email protected] Quarterly magazine

ISSN 2340-289X march 2014

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INDEX WINTER WARRIOR

CHAOS (Frozen in Time)

Sergiusz Peczek tears a frosty page from the Eastern Front as he demonstrates in a logical, step-by -step manner how to create a worn winter white wash on this battle weary StuG III.

Diego Quijano erects an evocative monument that pays homage to winter warfare topped with a whimsical, yet gruesome reminder of war’s ultimate pag. 38 fate.

pag. 6

JU88 A4

SNOW DOG

Spring thaws offered no relief to the ground crews as Jamie Haggo tackles the subject in a splendid display of airborne camouflage techniques and weathering effects on this wingedwar bird. pag. 12

The post-apocalyptic winter is the setting as Keven Derken presents the Snow Dog(MaK), an artificial intelligence killer suited to blend with the desolate landscape. pag. 44

MINOGA

Clay Kemp tackles the thankless reality of winters’ wrath *as* he plows a path through the Snow and Ice issue with the modern, purpose driven snow plow. Snow, ice, and slush are all on display with this winterized road warrior. pag. 48

Artistry and ice are showcased in this spectacular diorama by Jean-Benard Andre where he masterfully blends technique and emotion to portray the story of an icebound submarine. pag. 18

SNOW PLOW

SAILING THE FROZEN SEAS

WAFFEN SS GRENADIER

Antarctic research ship Soya cuts a path through the frozen waters as Rick Lawler explains his methods for adding ice flows and frosty effects in a nautical theme. pag. 26

Gunther Sternberger provides a figure painting Master Class as he paints a late-war Waffen SS Grenadier as shown in winter anorak and trousers. A small scenic base sets the scene. pag. 60

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Period photos often show vehicles with winter camouflage of white, and often these white camouflages are scuffed, worn and dirty – a result from the harsh conditions. At first it might seem that making this type of an appearance on our models would be simple – paint some white and wipe it off – simple!

Well, maybe not.

As we will see in this article, producing a convincing worn-winter camouflage is best accomplished when we plan our steps and develop the appearance following a logical path.

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1 The model is made ready for painting using a primer of Citadel Chaos Black. I then apply the base colors using Ammo acrylic colors, using darker shades of color onto the lower areas and lighter shades on top of the superstructure.

Sergiusz Peczek

2 After a light brown wash, small chips and scratches are applied overall using a sponge and fine tipped brush with Ammo acrylics, and with enamels using speckling technique.

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To prepare for the winter white camouflage, a layer of Scratches Effects fluid is applied overall in several thin layers.

Using AMMO Washable White, I outlined the markings with many irregular lines as if they were hand-painted by crew members. I also started to overspray the model with white acrylic.

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To add variation to the white finish, Ammo Cremeweiss was also applied to differentiate certain areas of the white wash, as you can see I work with small sections at one time for better control of the whole process.

Using a stiff brush moistened with water I started to remove the white wash camouflage. As you can see the washes and chipping stages are now visible in natural order.

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7 Once the whitewash and chipping stages are completed, the details and surface textures are redefined using Brown Wash for German Dark Yellow – a perfect color for using over white.

9 The most important stage of a “Snow & Ice” vehicle is choosing a variety of products to achieve different looks. Tamiya Snow effect is outstanding product with two gradations of mineral particles. Vallejo Water Effects and Still Water are great for ice and icicles; Andrea Snow is mineral powder great for fresh blown snow and Ammo Pigment fixer and Wet Effects for fixing the Andrea snow and blending all together.

8 Streaks of dirt and grime are painted using Ammo Brown Wash and Engine Grime, again, colors that work well for a yellow-white vehicle.

10 Tamiya Snow texture paint applied with a brush

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11 On the lower hull an application of mud is first applied using pigments and enamel paints. Over the mud the snow is applied; thicker concentrations first followed by finer, more precise applications.

13 The tracks receive the same snow treatment and on the vehicle; first a sprinkle of Andrea Snow.

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12 Andrea Snow sprinkled over to achieve the natural look of the blown snow, and then fixed using capillary action of the AMMO pigment fixer.

14 The snow is held in place using pigment fixer.

15 Icicles are made from sections of stretched clear sprue.

16 Small sections of the stretched sprue is glued in place using superglue, the final irregular appearance was achieved with a few layers of Vallejo Water Effect Gel.

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I think it’s pretty fair to say that it is common knowledge that the winters on the eastern front in the Second World War could be described as brutal; for both man and machine. In the first winter, the Luftwaffe was caught by surprise and many aircraft had hastily applied winter white wash. However, in later winters the Germans were able to prepare thoroughly and so by the time the first winter snows fell, sufficient supplies of temporary obtainable and time available to paint the aircraft with spring thaws came, some aircraft had the white wash

white wash were more care. When the removed however many

were done in stages or even left to weather naturally. This is a gift for us modellers and provides a neat canvass for trying some extreme weathering techniques. This particular machine had the white wash removed from the cowlings to help with camouflage against the thawing landscape which makes for an unusual model. This kit is the Revell boxing of the Dragon Junkers Ju 88A-4. This was probably the most common variant of this versatile aircraft and had a long combat career in all theatres which means the colour schemes are pretty limitless. The model, despite aging, is still good however this one was enhanced with pretty much every resin product I could get my hands on. In addition, full rivet detail was added using an RB Productions rivet wheel tool. This produced a nice weathering effect which you can see in the final photos, but more of that later. 12 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / SNOW & ICE

Jamie Haggo

For painting this model I chose RLM 65 Light Blue for the underside colour from the Gunze range of paints. You may also be able to make out that a lightened version of the colours has been sprayed randomly to fade the finish and break up the monotone colour.

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The upper surfaces are painted in a camouflage splinter pattern of RLM 70 and 71. Since these colours will be overlaid with a whitewashed finish, there is little point in taking time for fading the surface like the underside colour.

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3 With the decals applied, MXpression Panzer Putty was placed on and eased into shape with a cocktail stick. This will protect the markings from overspray, much like the real aeroplane.

4 The worn whitewashed finish is begun by applying 2 light coats of hairspray onto the upper surfaces. AMMO Scratches Effects is a good alternative and was used on the engine cowlings to create varying effects.

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6 You’ll note that the fuselage markings were not masked, this is because I wanted a feathered edge. Any overspray would be easy to clean up during the chipping stage with water and a brush as it would be very thin.

5 Now it was time for the white wash. Tamiya XF-2 Flat White was thinned with tap water and a few drops of Isopropyl Alcohol and misted on. The effect was built up slowly producing the patchy finish.

7 And now the fun part as ordinary tap water and a soft brush are used to create the chips. Keeping the area damp is important, and using different types of brushes can be used to create different types of chips.

8 For a more, generalized faded effect, a well-worn MasterCaster’s miracle sanding sponge was gently rubbed over the surface. Scuffing the finish in this manner produces a nice general fading of the pain and also rubs the paint from high spots revealing all the rivet detail.

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The underside doesn’t escape. A heavily mix of the Winter Streaking Grime is pin-washed into the panel lines as well as using the effect for a first light filter. Any excess colour can be washed away using a clean brush moistened with thinner.

9 In general, aeroplanes are not treated as harshly as AFVs so we have to factor this in during the weathering phase. A heavily diluted filter using AK Interactive’s Winter Streaking Grime is applied using a large soft brush. This process will add depth to the paintwork and soften the effects of our chipping. Oil paints are very versatile tool. I wanted to make the bomb bay doors and certain other panel lines more weathered so a slightly thinned grey colour artist’s oils was brushed in the relevant areas.

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Traditionally aircraft modellers would wipe off the excess in the direction of the airflow, however, I find this method to be a bit heavy handed and hard to control as tends to create something closer to a smear

14 Returning to the upper surfaces, a slightly thinned AMMO Streaking Grime for Winter Vehicles is applied with a fine brush to the panel line detail. This mixed with Abteilung Shadow Brown oil paint is brushed into the tail plane/elevator join to create an even deeper shadow.

I prefer using a soft brush moistened with thinner to clean and blend the excess oil colours. This more precise method allows me much more control in creating depth and shadows.

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And once again the excess is removed using a moist brush. As you can see, this style of weathering includes a lot of back and forth between applying colour and then cleaning it off.

Fuel stains on aircraft are unique. Spilt fuel will quickly attract dirt and grime so to replicate this, a mix of Abteilung Shadow Brown and grey coloured artist’s oils was carefully painted on and then blended for a natural staining effect.

We can use a mix of products to do some nice splattering effects. A mix of Winter Streaking Grime, Engine Grime and Shadow Brown oil paint thinned is flicked onto the underside. It looks horrible right now, but have no fear – it will be ok.

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Taking a very slightly moist brush, the splatters are gently blended into the base coat.

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The effect is very subtle, but it adds yet more depth and a layer of grime which is typical for aeroplanes. You will note that on the ailerons, the same mix has been streaked back with a flat brush showing dirt and grime which has been affected by airflow.

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For the vast majority of the time, aeroplanes, especially bombers are sitting out in the elements awaiting the next mission. The winter white was affected by rain so vertical streak marks are evident on the paint work. Here, thinned Humbrol enamel mixed with Abteilung UN dirty White is applied in fine lines with a suitable brush.

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Then as before, a wide brush moistened in thinner, it is dragged downwards.

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The effect is very subtle but it is there and looks great. Its one of those that you don’t necessarily see it but if you didn’t do it, then the paint would look bland. If it’s too subtle, you can always just keep adding more until you’re happy.

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Jean-Benard Andre

I believe that my modeling style is very expressive. I believe that the purpose of a piece is to tell a story, to elicit emotion, to invoke thought. To accomplish this, for me to be successful in my effort it is important that each and every element be considered; from the textures, colors, context and composition. For this scene I am challenged to produce a winter scene showing the Russian submarine “Minogo”, ice bound in frigid Arctic waters. The scenic elements will of course be focused around ice, snow and water – and although my style is expressive by nature, this does not exclude careful research and observation of these incidences in the real world. This is important, because in order for a modeler to be successful in whatever his chosen style (including expressive) the elements must be recognizable and familiar to his audience.

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Using reference photographs as my guide, Plaster of Paris is formed to create the rough shape of the large iceberg.

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While the plaster is still workable the characteristic stratums seen in aged ice formations are created using an old brush and then smoothed-out with a damp brush.

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Once the plaster has hardened, sharper edges and crevices are carved into the hardened plaster using a utility knife. I keep working using these sculpting techniques until I am pleased with the shape.

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With the iceberg sculpted into its final form, the next step is to place the form onto a small box and then pour silicone rubber over the part in order to create a mold.

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Tools of the resin iceberg trade. Artist’s oil and Pebeo glass paints are mixed into the resin to give it a slight tint of blue and grey.

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Using the slow curing resin to my advantage, I wait until the resin starts to gel before brushing the thickening mix of turquoise and white resin onto the mold. The thicker resin allows me simply coat the exterior walls of the mold while maintaining an open interior cavity, this saves material and money – a good thing!

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7 Once the resin has hardened the part is extracted from the mold. Any unwanted blemishes are easily sanded away using my Dremel.

9 Using an old brush, the colored resin is painted onto the surfaces to reinforce the highlights and shadows. As I continue to work the resin continues to cure and eventually there becomes point where the resin becomes unworkable. At that point it is time to either make more resin or call it finished.

11 The same type of resin as used to create the iceberg is again used to create the water. Visual depth is attained by pouring the resin in layers; the bottom layer being dark grey in color with a brighter turquoise blue color used for the surface layers.

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8 With the resin piece in hand, it is now time to add some icy shadows and highlights. Small cups of tinted resin are mixed and then, as before, set aside until the resin is almost set to a consistency similar to thick syrup.

10 Finally the iceberg is given a spray of semi-gloss varnish. One point worth noting; it is important that the iceberg receive a slightly different luster than the surrounding water. If both elements have the same glossy appearance then the distinction between the water and the ice is lost.

13 The basic coloring of the Minogo’s conning tower is realized using a variety of acrylic paints with an emphasis on creating strong highlights and shadows.

12 Homemade photo etched parts combined with plastic card, Magic Sculpt putty and a good deal of fitting and a good deal of sanding results in the centerpiece of this project; the Russian submarine Minoga.

14 I painted the surface details using a small brush and enamel paints. As seen here, AK Salt Streaks are applied to the upper edges and around the surface details and then pulled downward to create soft streaking over the vertical surfaces.

15 Putting the final touches onto the scene. Snowy caps are painted onto the tops of the iceberg using Liqutex paints tinted slightly using grey and blue acrylic colors.

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Winter whitewash finishes can be one of the most fun and interesting subjects to tackle. The effects can range from almost pure, solid white through to virtually no whitewash remaining. Techniques for these effects in 1/72nd scale are very similar to those for larger scales but can involve slight differences in the execution. Here I apply a worn temporary whitewash to Dragon’s SdKfz 263, representing a vehicle sometime during the spring months after the weather has taken its toll on the winter camouflage.

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Alex Clark

1 Dragon’s kit is generally good but I refined some of the details. It includes features from different time periods so I also fixed these issues.

3 The model received a base colour of Humbrol grey enamel followed by the addition of the markings. A sprayed coat of Klear (Future) varnish helps seal everything before a couple of sprayed applications of AMMO chipping fluids. Over this a thin layer of Tamiya white acrylic is airbrushed on.

2 I added a single resin crew figure from Total War Miniatures. This will add a splash of colour to the mostly white and grey finish.

4 The white is gradually removed using warm water and a small brush with the bristles cut down. Focus more on the areas that would receive the most wear rather than removing it uniformly.

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5 For 1/72nd it’s especially important to try and keep things to scale. A sharpened toothpick or needles are used to add the micro-scratches. Be careful not to push too hard or the grey base coat will be removed too!.

6 A light dry-brushing in selected areas helps to soften the contrast between the 2 colours and adds variety to the strength of the white effect.

8 Bring the details to life using a black enamel pin wash. A clean brush and thinners is useful to remove any excess paint. This can be repeated to reinforce the effect after the following steps

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7 A brown enamel wash gives a nice grimy effect. This needs to be kept quite dilute for a white finish otherwise it will dull the effect too much.

9 A liberal application of Tamiya Diorama Texture Paint is given to the chassis using an old, flat brush. This has a nice gritty appearance that works well in 1/72nd scale.

10 The smaller details, such as the tools, are now painted. These may or may not have been covered in whitewash on the real vehicles but it looks better to paint them in the original colours.

11 Small streaks of rust are applied to a few areas using a dilute mix of Orange enamel. Burnt Umber oil paint can also be added to this to give a stronger, more vibrant effect.

12 The small size of the model can be seen here and the importance of trying to keep the effects in scale.

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Snow and ice can be found in many latitudes in our world, northern and southern hemispheres alike experience the chilly side of Mother Nature. So when it came time to address our theme Rick Lawler

of Ice and Snow why not get straight to the point and visit the coldest region of the world, Antarctica – or more specifically the icy waters that surround our fifth largest continent. The centerpiece of our scene is the Antarctic Observation Ship, SOYA; whose exploits include a number of successful expeditions to Antarctica during the years of 1956 – 1962. Her most notable excursion being in 1958 when she rescued explorers stranded from the first expedition at the Syowa Research Station. Our focus, however, is upon the ice filled water that is her route, and the techniques and tools I used to create the frigid seascape.

1 The 1:350 scale SOYA Antarctic Observation Ship from Hasegawa is constructed and then painted in its base colors using acrylic paints.

3 The salt water and harsh weather conditions would certainly contribute to a faded and worn appearance to the ships painted surfaces. A light application of artist’s oils applied to certain areas along the hull is a good solution for creating subtle fading and slight shifts in color.

2 It stands to reason that a ship whose mission is to explore ice filled waters would experience a good deal of scrapes and damage to her paintwork along the water line. A fine tipped brush and acrylic paints are used to create these effects.

4 Surface details and panel lines are enhanced using localized applications of AMMO 1005 Dark Brown Wash. Any areas of unwanted color can be easily cleaned away using a clean brush slightly moistened with thinner.

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Vertical streaking caused by dirt and grime washing down the sides of the hull are created using a light grey colored enamel color applied with a fine tipped brush. These streaks are allowed to sit and dry for about 5 minutes and then brushed back and faded using a clean, soft brush.

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The same process of adding vertical streaks is used again, this time using white enamel paint to create the accumulated effects of water run-off down the sides of the hull.

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Rigging was accomplished using stretched plastic cut to length and then secured using white glue.

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The type of snow effects that I have chosen to use are fairly transparent and so I need to add a backing layer of white in order to help cover the bright orange hull color. I am not looking for complete coverage so the white acrylic paint has been heavily thinned with water before application.

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Gravel and Sand Glue is brushed over the white painted areas in order to give an adhesive layer for the snowy effects that follow. I am following photo references of ships sailing in frozen waters when deciding upon where the effects are placed on the ship.

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Glass spheres, or Micro Balloons are sifted over the ship’s hull. On those areas where I have applied the Fixer the balloons stick to the surface to create accumulated ice and snow effects from the ocean spray. The excess spheres are simply blown away.

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The base for the icy water is a block of foam cut to size, and then the shape of the ship is traced upon the surface.

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Following the traced outline a cavity is carved into the base that will allow the ship to sit down into the “water”.

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A test fit determines that the ship sits at the proper depth. You will also notice that I have cut plastic sheet to form a box in which the foam water now sits. This box will later be painted in a black satin finish.

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Small ripples and waves are added onto the foam surface using 2 part sculpting putty. The particular reference photos that I am following show the cold, icy waters to be a deep grey in color which I’ve replicated using acrylic paints. Notice that I have intentionally varied the grey color in hope of adding interest and depth to the finish.

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The “ice” is made from 1/8” plastic sheet, cut into shapes and then laid out onto the surface. Again, following my references the “ice” in the wake of the ship is smaller in size and is dispersed by the ships forward motion.

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The SOYA is placed into the foam cavity and then begins the process of unifying the ship with the watery surface. The tops of the epoxy waves are given small foamy whitecaps using white acrylic paint.

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Two part clear resin is poured over top the painted foam surface. A small raised boarder has been added to the top edge of the box so that the resin does not run over the sides.

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I use an applicator to fill the foam cavity around the ship in order to unify the water level and, once the resin has cured, the model will be secured in place.

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19 Now for the tricky part! I have learned from experience that one of the worst enemies of the type of resin that I am using is water. Moisture in resin causes the resin to foam, generally an unwanted side-effect, but in this case I use this “mistake” to my advantage to create a churned ice and water effect. A small amount of white acrylic paint (water based) is added to the clear resin and then applied using an applicator just under the surface of the clear resin.

21 Gravel & Sand Glue is applied to the top surfaces of the plastic ice flow in preparation for a layer of snow.

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20 As the foamy resin cures, smaller “chunks of ice” are place under the bow of the ship to simulate it crashing through the ice.

22 Once again, micro balloons are sifted over the surface to create a fresh layer of light snow. After the Fixer has dried the excess powder is blown off and cleaned from the water areas.

After a night spent engaged with RAF night raiders, a lone aircraft limps for home in the cold, grey dawn. The normally reliant BMW engine, already running rough, shakes and sputters one last time before losing all power - the aircraft begins its heavy decent towards earth. Below, the glimmer of a frozen river beckons our pilot; the only available landing option in this rough terrain. Upon landing our pilot realizes that his deadly advenAitor Azcue

ture has only just begun as he comes face to face with a new deadly foe. And just as in the combat in the air, on the frozen ground our pilot must be aware of potential dangers coming from his rear - “Bandit at Five”.

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The focal point of our scene, the 1/32nd scale FW190 night fighter decorated with an interesting winter camouflage.

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As a first step, I recommend conducting color tests with

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The products I will be using in creating the ice effects; 2 part resin consisting of the resin and catalyst, blue and white enamel colors for tinting and a syringe for application.

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Following the manufacturer’s directions the resin is mixed in an old container. The tinting colors are added drop by drop and thoroughly mixed into the clear resin.

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Once mixed, the resin is poured into a form built from plastic sheet. This type of resin is slow curing which allows plenty of working time for mixing and pouring.

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After approximately 8 hours of time, the resin has cured to a point that it can be “worked”. In this case, small waves and surface ripples are pressed into the still soft resin using an old latex glove as the form.

the resin to find the correct color for the scene. In the end I felt that these colors were too blue for the mood of my scene and made adjustments to the color.

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7 After a full 24 hours the resin is set and can be removed from the plastic mold. I break the large square shape with a few taps of the hammer; these pieces will become the fractured ice in our scene.

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A small, but important detail as the edges of the fractured resin are given “broken ice” texture using my hobby knife.

10 The elements are test fit onto the base and the scene begins to take shape. Notice that the plastic form used for the resin has provided me with nice edges for the ice and that I have trimmed back the wingtip in order for the airplane to fit within the perimeter.

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Using acrylic paints, I apply an overall base color to represent the water under the ice.

11 Chunks of ice are placed deliberately under the cowling to represent the ice breaking due to the weight of the aircraft.

12 The general shape of the shoreline is built-up using molding putty.

13 The groundwork is detailed by adding large stones formed from putty and twigs from the garden represent small trees.

14 Shoreline snow will be made by adding Micro Balloons to Scenic Bond. Mixed together, these ingredients make a light, foaming paste that can be brushed onto the surfaces to represent fresh snow.

15 Using an old brush the snow mixture is dabbed onto the surfaces. Note that the larger stones and the trees have been painted beforehand using acrylic paints. Icy snow will be created using “Artificial Snow” from Andrea Miniatures along with gloss varnish. To begin, a layer of varnish is applied onto an area of the ice.

16 17 The fresh snow product is lightly sprinkled onto the varnished areas.

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18 Scrapes and skid marks from the plane crash are etched into the surface using the teeth of my hobby saw.

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I add a small amount of gloss varnish to the scratches in order to regain their luster.

21 The green tinted resin is mixed and then poured into the cracks around the chunks of ice, locking them into place and creating a sense of depth to the water.

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Returning to the resin, I mix a small amount of green tinted resin. This resin will be poured in between the cracked ice to represent the water underneath.

22 As a final touch I dab small amounts of Water Effects onto the ice simulating light, blown snow.

CHAOS Frozen in Time Some modelers may discount snow as a scenic element because they are afraid that its effects will only cover details and hide all of the hard work that you have put into your model. Obviously, I do not agree. Applied with some taste and a little skill, snow can be used to increase contrast, enhance interest – and even elevate the storyline. And remember snow is not always new, white and fluffy; many effects can also be achieved by with dirty and muddy snow. Let´s turn this small 1/48 scene into a cold, winter scene – with a frosty twist - in only a few steps. Let it snow!

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Diego Quijano

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To imitate snow I use a mix of three elements; white glue, microballoons (Snow coat from the Small Shop) and marble powder. The marble powder can be found in craft and art shops.

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Adding marble powder helps to give the snow a more realistic appearance as I have found that using the micro-balloons along gives produces a snow that is too foamy. White glue and water are added to complete the snow mixture.

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til cumulate un wing it to ac lo al , ow sn h simply an old brus 3 Using e satisfied with the appearance. you ar to some shape xture or give te e th ge you can chan nce applied, 4 O e snow using a toothpick or brush. th g ed spots usin move undesir re or s er re rd tu ften the bo e snow mix lly, you can so water. If th 5 Fina ush that is slightly moistened with you are working just add a a br g bowl while y in the mixin begins to dr refresh. little water to

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more ust be a little vehicle we m e th to on g the snow surfaces. When placin mess on the d making a oi av to as careful so a damp moved using ended or re bl be n ca s oking area Unnatural lo brush.

d sprue. arent stretche bits of transp l al sm sparent ed an tr us icicles I d of the To make the heat one en st fir ; sy ea e is quite The techniqu candle. e flame of a th sprue with

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Next, while holding the sprue securely with one hand, while slowly stretching the heated sprue with the other hand.

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The key is to roll the sprue before it gets cold to get a twisted, conical shaped rod.

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Finally, cut the icicles to length and repeat the process until you have made enough icicles for your scene.

ore

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prue.

parent

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py snowots. Our cree

anches or ro

glue or op of white g a small dr in us e ac pl d in icicle is glue 12 Each r transparent slow drying glue. othe plying an icy look ap e we can get ac pl in rtain ly ce m g in e fir -balloons, leav e the icicles ar 13 Onc ix of AMMO Water Effects and microral appearance. am t for a natu ely transparen areas complet ape using the basic sh first creating by e ad m as snowman w 14 The eling putty. mod

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all br made with sm The arms are s some props. man also need

u used mixture. If yo with our snow an m white ow es sn ac e rf r th e su ext, we cove ea to paint th 16 N n-white colored putty it is a good id no . ng the snow before applyi is added ditional snow place and ad to on s. Finad ng ue di gl is ith the surroun w it The snowman e at gr te in 17 of the tank se in order to d to the sides around the ba ow are adde sn g tin el m es of lly, small trickl Wet Effects. O M M A using

1 Before primer, a light coat of putty thinned with lacquer thinner is painted over the entire surface of the model. Thinned down to a liquid consistency as to not fill in or cover up any details.

3 Oxide Red lacquer is then painted over the black layer. These coats are thinned quite liberally.

5 As you can see in this photo, the lacquer paint is thinned to a runny consistency (50/50) with lacquer thinner in this layering technique.

2 For the first undercoat, we brush on a black lacquer paint thinned with lacquer thinner.

4 Once the undercoats are dry the first layer for our Camouflage pattern is started on the Hund.

6 The camouflage pattern is completed using 2 different green colors of lacquer paints. The brush strokes are purposely applied to the model using a loose and expressionistic brush stroke.

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / SNOW & ICE / 45

7 We then paint a German gray acrylic paint thinned with water to achieve a matte finish on the mechanical areas of the model.

8 Artists oils are highly thinned to create a filter using odorless thinner and then applied over the entire surface of the model. After approximately 10 minutes most of the oil colors are wiped off using cotton swabs.

9 White enamel paint is used for a winter white wash. The effects are applied with a flat brush and painted sporadically, not worrying about complete coverage.

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10 A wash of white enamel paint is applied overall and allowed to dry for about 15 minutes. White spirit is then used to reactivate the paint in order to establish a worn appearance.

11 The weathering process is started with a coat of A. Mig 1005 Dark Brown Wash from AMMO is used over the seams and edges of the Hund.

12 The dark wash is allowed to dry for about 20 minutes before being cleaned back with white spirits and small brush. This is allowed to dry for at least 24 hours and then the process can be repeated until satisfied.

13 Following in the same process of adding a wash and then cleaning back the area, washes using AK Light Rust and Rust Streaks are applied sparingly to certain areas of the Hund. Finally, AK Engine Oil and Engine Grime are applied in and around the joints to simulate grease.

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / SNOW & ICE / 47

Clay Kemp

When most people think of snow, they tend to think

turally be placed on a vehicle working hard to keep

of the pure white, fluffy stuff. But spend any amount

the streets and roads clear during the tough Winter

of time during the Winter months and you’ll see that

months. The AMT kit here was built, weathered, and

snow takes on all sorts of shades and consistencies.

completely finished before I started applying the

From the picturesque, soft newly fallen snow. To the

snow effects to hopefully

wet, dingy, slushy stuff that is all over the roads as it

capture how it would

is cleared away. Snow and ice has many forms.

happen in real life.

Growing up and living all my life in the Midwest of the United States, I’m no stranger to snow and long Winters. Most people who live in areas that get a lot of snow fall into two categories. You either love it or hate it! But you can’t deny its beauty, or its place in quickly setting a scene when it is used in scale modeling. On this snow plow project, I’ll try to convey several types of snow, as well as show how it can na48 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / SNOW & ICE

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The first mix will be more transparent, slushy type of snow. Woodlands snow powder is mixed with an acrylic resin to create the slushy snow.

3 Moving to the chassis, the slush mixture is dabbed onto logical areas where ice and snow would accumulate as the vehicle moves.

Starting on the mud flaps, the slush is gently placed on the backside where it would naturally be flung up by the rear tires and built up against the flap.

4 The bottom of the dump bed is also an excellent area for snow accumulation. All the structure ridges will have build up slush from the tires flinging it up.

5 The bottom side also has several areas of slush build up. Along the bottom of the chassis rails, rear differentials, and the battery box all get covered.

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Flipping the mudflaps over, the outside has slush placed up along the bottom edges.

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To simulate salt staining and a general base level of between the works grime / light colored enamel paint is lightly airbrushed along the lower and back portions of the dump bed.

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Once dry it is gently streaked downward with white spirit and a flat brush.

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Light colored enamel paint is also lightly airbrushed over the dried slush mixture on the mud flaps.

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To finish off the flaps a bit of A. Mig 2015 Wet Effect is dabbed over the dried slush.

11 Moving to the front of the truck a misting of pale gray Tamiya acrylics is applied to create more fading and salt build-up. This also helps the snow mixture grip the paint on the cab a little better.

13 The backside of the snow blade is also lightly streaked with the acrylic gray paint.

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12 Another layer of paint is also added to the bed over the top of the previously applied light colored enamel.

14 A whiter, more fluffy type of snow will be made next. White pigment powder, Woodlands snow powder, and white craft glue will be mixed together.

15 Once thoroughly mixed together, the snow is ready to be applied. If the mixture is too thick, a bit of tap water can be added. I also added more snow flake than originally pictured to build up the volume.

17 Further along, and more and more of the top edges and supports are covered. Try to imagine the snow coming straight down, and apply it to the upper most raised parts.

19 The bed has several edges that allow for some great opportunities to add accumulated snow. As the vehicle moves, the air will push the snow down, and back. So try to build it up as the wind has pushed it into place. It can also be built up along the tops of the wooden boards.

16 Starting with the blade the snow mixture is applied to all of the upper surfaces where the fresh snow would land.

18 The build-up along the front edge is kept low and thick. The upper area of the built up snow is gently pulled up with the brush once the mixture starts to set up.

20 The back tail gate is treated the same as the sides. Keep the snow low, and packed into the crevices. It is also streaked upwards slightly to feather out the edges of the built up snow.

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21 The mixture is thinned a bit more with tap water before working on the cab. This thinner mixture is easier to spread around, and works to create a bit thinner, more powdery looking snow.

23 With both the slush, and lighter fluffy snow all applied, the last step is to add some dampness. AMMO’s Wet Effects is again streaked along the bed to show wet areas as the snow melts and streaks down the truck.

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22 This thinner mixture is worked all along the lower windshield area, as well as the hood and fender tops.

24 A few more streaks are applied to the top surfaces, and with that, our snow plow is ready to get back to clearing the streets!

John F. Steinman, DMD Winter’s snow and ice environmental effects are often overlooked by many of today’s modelers because they are thought to be difficult to master. In the northern climes (where I happen to live), winter’s grip can last four to five months; it seems such a shame to skip the opportunity to replicate these effects. With some preplanning and the right materials I hope to show just how easy it can be to replicate winter in scale.

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Completed, unpainted model. This is Tamiya’s 1/48th scale SU-122 with Hauler photo-etch and a stolen panther road wheel.

First step is to apply the base color (after priming), in this instance a medium green colored base, followed by a worn white wash layer using the hairspray technique.

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The model is now ready for the application of snow. It has received multiple pin washes, filters and streaking, as well as chipping and grease, oil and fuel stains. Since dry powdery snow doesn’t adhere very well, and have very little texture, I am going to use a wet mixture application. Clear, finely ground acrylic polymer is mixed with wet effects to a cottage cheese consistency.

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My collection of material to be used for paint mapping. Mapping is a technique used to add back, or brighten the finish (in this case the white wash) by applying light and irregular applications of paint.

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As seen here, paint mapping using oils and odorless thinner has had good effect to vary the visual depth and crispness of the white wash.

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A layer of wet mud is applied to the lower hull using a combination of pigments, enamels and gloss media. This will form a base layer to which the snow will be applied. This same mixture is applied to the road wheels and tracks, albeit in a much more dilute consistency.

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The mixture is painted on to the tracks with an old brush. It appears clear here, but as the mixture dries, the clear acrylic will become visible and look like packed snow.

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Small globs of the mixture are applied to all the road wheels. I vary the amount and pattern of application.

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After setting for a few hours, the effect becomes much more pleasing and realistic.

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The tracks are added to the model, sans the road wheels, and the snow mixture is applied over the wet mud on the sides of the lower hull. Make sure not to get any on the axels as the mixture sets like cement!

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The road wheels are added and then more snow effects applied to the fenders and undersides where wet snow would be thrown by the moving tracks.

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The rear lower hull is treated slightly differently. Here the area is painted with a thick layer of the wet effects, and then the dry polymer is sprinkled on top. This style of application is useful for even snow accumulations on large flat areas.

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A close up showing the effects of twisting verses straight stretched sprue. The bottom example was not twisted before it cooled, while the top 3 received the twist. The textural quality of those that were twisted far surpasses the untwisted one.

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To simulate ice, or in this case icicles, I first stretch clear sprue, but before it fully cools I twist both ends in opposite directions.

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Icicles are cemented in place using cyanoacrylate(CA) glue in areas that snow would melt then refreeze, in this case the upper rear plate near the exhaust. Texture is added by applying thick CA along the surface of the icicle.

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Jeff Meyer The quality of model railroad rolling stock has improved greatly over the past ten years. The amount of detailing and exquisite paint jobs on the-

1 The 1:87 Model right out of the box, made by Atlas Model Railroad Co. After some modifications and decals we will seal the entire car with Testors Dullcote to prepare it for the fading. Using Dullcote from an aerosol can will work just fine.

se ready to run models has reduced the need to build and paint models from kits. In this article we will show a few simple techniques for fading the factory paint and adding rust. Using nothing more than some AK Washes and a few oil paints we can transform a mass produced 1:87 model into a unique representation of the prototype.

2 I learned this fading technique from my good friend. Begin by placing a drop of Zinc White oil paint onto a notecard. Then, working on three panels at a time use a small flat brush to cover the desired area.

THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / SNOW & ICE / 57

3 Using a soft filbert brush, remove some of the paint and smooth out the finish. Wipe off any excess paint from the brush on a soft piece of cloth.

5 Rust is applied to the roof by stippling on rust tones of oil paints. Lightly flood the edges of rust with Odorless Thinner to soften the edges and create some slight runoff.

7 Burnt Umber oil paint is used to add darker areas of rust to the middle of the rust spots. The roof was finished by adding some light applications of AK Track Wash and AK Dark Silver powder to the larger areas of rust.

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4 A fan brush is used to remove any remaining brush strokes. The white oil paint will need about 2-3 days to fully dry. Once dry, seal it again with Dullcote to prepare the model for following washes and filters.

6 Using a trimmed down brush with only two or three bristles, we can add small pits, scrapes, and streaks using oil paints. Make sure the paint goes on smooth and flat, we want to avoid any out of scale texture.

8 To recreate the tiny pits, scrapes, and streaks, we will need to trim down some already small brushes, typically leaving less than five bristles. AMMO of Mig Jimenez, Rust Streaks, Burnt Sienna and Transparent Orange Iron Oxide oil paints work great for streaking effects. For the darker pits and scrapes we will use Burnt Umber oil paint.

9 Working from a prototype picture as your guide is one of the best ways to insure that your weathering will look believable. The model will represent a car that is five to ten years older than the prototype picture and painted out for its new owner. If you look closely near bottom of the car you can see that the rust is in the same location as the picture.

11 A small flat brush dampened with White Spirit is used to soften the edges and straighten the streak if necessary. AK Rust Streaks can be used on top of the streaks and near the bottom of the streaks to simulate lighter run off.

10 Using a small brush with longer bristles, pick up a small amount of Burnt Sienna oil paint by slowly pulling the bristles over a drop of paint. Almost like putting paint on the edge of a razor blade. Slowly pull the brush down the model, the longer bristles will help keep the streaks straight.

12 We can apply horizontal scrapes in the same manner as the streaks, but this time we will use Burnt Umber to simulate older damage. Add tiny streaks from the scrapes and pits using either Burnt Sienna or AK Rust Streaks.

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Winter Warrior - Waffen-SS Grenadier It is agreed that a good figure can enhance a model in nearly every situation. I think that it is also agreed that for many modelers, painting a convincing figure can be one of the greatest challenges in our hobby. As I will demonstrate, the painting process can be made simple if performed in logical steps. This figure represents the typical winter outfit of a Waffen-SS Grenadier comprising of a late war winter anorak and winter trousers during one of the last missions in cold Eastern European environment during the winter of 1944/45. Accordingly, the figure is displayed on a snowy and icy base vignette, which captures the typical setting.

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To begin, the entire figure is painted black to ensure a good foundation and depth of color.

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Figure painting begins with the face with the colors that I will be using are shown here. The base color is created using 876 Brown Sand with 814 Burnt Cadmium Red mixed in a 1:1 ratio, highlighting color 815 Basic Skintone and for shadows I use color 850 Medium Olive.

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Gunther Steinberger 60 / THE WEATHERING MAGAZINE / SNOW & ICE

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The initial painting of the face is conducted using the 1:1 mix of Vallejo 876 Brown Sand and 814 Burnt Cadmium Red.

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Mouth and eyes are painted Black in the next stage.

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Vallejo White is brushed with a fine Windsor & Newton Series 7 in the middle of the before mentioned areas.

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Detail painting of the eyes is conducted with a light Blue circle and a Black dot in the middle. The lips are painted with Vallejo 814.

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Highlighting of the face is done with a mixture of the face color with Vallejo 815 Basic Skintone, concentrating on the raised areas such as the cheekbones and bridge of the nose.

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Deep shadows painted with a mixture of the face color and a little bit Vallejo 950 Black.

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To blend the colors and remove the sharp contrasts, the Basic Skintone color 815 is highly diluted with water and washed over the face. A touch of black paint can be added to the wash to create five o’clock shadow on the lower jaw.

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Here the painting of the face has been finished. The key of a nice looking painted face is the repetition of the whole blending and contrasting processes until the effect has a realistic appearance.

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The boots are primed wit Vallejo Black 950 mixed with a little bit 846 Mahogany Brown.

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Pure Vallejo 826 German Camouflage Brown is painted over the upper folds and the sole. Black is brushed into the slots to increase the depth. Once this layer has dried a diluted black wash is used to unify the finish.

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The parka is primed with a mixture of Vallejo 830 German Field Grey with an added drop of Tamiya flat base X-21. The upper edges of the folds are emphasized with a lightened mixture of the base color, while the shadows are created by adding black to the base color. As before, the final step is a light wash of the base Field Grey color.

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The seams on the trousers and parka are carefully painted in a black color using a fine tipped brush. Afterward, a thin streak of lightened base color is painted over the black stripe to blend the seam with the background fabric color.

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15 Finally a small winter scenic base is created by first giving the top of the pedestal a initial coating of sandy paste. Over this, a diluted layer of white glue is applied and NOCH grass sprinkled over top.

16 Then entire base is airbrushed black in order to create depth and shadows. Then, successive layers of autumn colors are dry brushed onto the surfaces to bring up highlight colors. Small branches, roots and foliage are set in place with drops of white glue.

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17 Finally, the base is winterized using Magic Snow sprinkled over the groundwork. Magic Snow is available in two grades; I have used the coarse version. After completion of the base, the finished figure can be fixed on the base with cyanoacrylate glue.

CHOOSE THE RIGHT PRODUCT There are plenty of special products for making ice and snow and sometimes very hard to choose which is the best. The choice has lot has to do with your chosen technique and scale also plays role in the decision. Unfortuantely we didn’t have a lot time or space in this section to go into deep detail, but we have selected a few products which are quite interesting and easy to find. This is a little analysis to get into the wide world of snow in modeling. In the previous Kursk Issue we explained that due to a factory fire, the Woodland Scenic in USA products would be hard to find. Good news is that the incident did not affect production and we are glad to pass along that information here. Woodland Scenic continues to provide products and we look forward to new releases regularly. Many of them will be represented them in future issues of TWM.

WOODLAND SCENIC. This manufacturer offers a tremendous product for snow with a very realistic look and the coverage area is good. Grain size is medium and fine, in different thicknesses with a crystalline appearance. No doubt this is the perfect choice for large winter dioramas, large scales as 1/16, or railway dioramas.

SCENEARAMA. This product is manufactured by Woodland Scenic. The appearance is basically the same as that of Woodland, but this mark provides a much smaller bag than can be perfect for small scenes or vignettes. Also the price is lower. This product can stick with white glue, or spray adhesives. It can also be mixed with very bright varnish to create various effects.

SCENIC SNOWFLAKES. The brand Deluxe Materials offers a wide range diorama product of many types and purposes. This pack includes several products for snow and ice but especially we will compare the Snowflakes that is equivalent to the others. This product is very different to the other two. The bead is thicker and have different sizes. It is more uniform and appearance is matt and less crystalline.

SNOW COAT. This is a product different from the other products mentioned, and also the most difficult to find. Dust from this product is extremely thin, highly crystalline and uniform. It can be mixed with diluted white glue with water and applied in thin layers on a ground vehicle or wax effects of fresh snow, for example. No doubt this is the perfect choice for little vignettes or small scales as 1/72, 1/100 or 1/144. But also can be perfect for add snow accumulations on some vehicles very accurately.

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How to make Snow and Ice

Snow is perhaps one of the more challenging states of precipitation to replicate faithfully. Our intended snowdrift can easily look more like a meringue or whipped cream topping; a frosted topping that ruins our work. Snow is a challenge that is made more difficult by the fact that a fresh snow can, if fact, look like a cream filling in real life. And so it becomes important for Rodrigo Hernández Cabos www.euromodelismo.com

modelers to take winter conditions, in all of its varied states, into account when creating a frozen scene. A scene of fresh, clean snow can be made more interesting (and realistic) with a trace of dirty snow; a pool of melting snow, icicles hanging from a branch or a frozen waterfall can become glimmering focal points within the blanket of white.

1 We start the process using a previously made base decorated for summertime. By the end of the process we will have transformed this scene into a natural winter environment.

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2 We begin by applying a dark modeling wash onto areas to where we wish to portray moisture from melting snow.

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LANO

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Still Water is applied using a fine brush over the previous dark washed areas to represent small trickles of water.

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Initially, the paste begins white in color but once dry the paste becomes transparent. Layer by layer we build volume to the ice and frozen waterfall.

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Using a brush moistened with tap water we manipulate and shape of the paste and work to build accumulations of ice on the plants and stream bank.

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Along streams water freezes in irregular shapes as it collects around the plants and bushes. The paste can be applied in several coats, and once the first coat is dry we will apply additional layers until satisfied with the result.

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Ice can be simulated with small bits of the plastic foam material found as protector in some packaging boxes.

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For snow we will be using two types of products; the Delux from UK and a two products from Spain. The two Spanish products offer a little diversity in color, with one of them being white and the other a bit greyish in color.

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A mixture of Still Water and Shoveled Snow is made into slurry and then applied to the places were we want show an icy or melted snow appearance.

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This same mixture is used to create a natural blending between the borders of ice and snow.

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Now we can add the first coat of snow onto the ground. Notice that the snow covering the plants and bushes is more fluid and translucent, while in the rocks and the road are more white and heavy. .

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The little cracks on the rocks are darkened with a mix of modeling wash and Still Water to represent moisture from the flowing water.

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We apply a layer of Scenic Shoveled Snow mixed with Still Water onto the tree branches. .

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Additional layers of the Shoveled Snow will give shape and volume to the areas of snow while leaving glimpses of the ice and transparent snow underneath.

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Using our references as a guide, we continue to shape and refine the characteristic shapes of snow-covered vegetation.

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General view of the finished snowy scene, except for the road where we will continue to work and add some special treatments.

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The greyish toned snow effects paste is poured this into the central area to portray worn snow and slush. We want this application to be localized so we build a dam using Blu-Tac to prevent the liquid from spilling across the entire road.

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After allowing the paste to dry for approximately 20 minutes it becomes stiff and will allow us to imprint footprints

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Before the paste dries completely we need to remove the Blu-Tak borders. The worn snow in the roads’ center is the blended into the fresh snow toward the edges.

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A view of the finished scene. All that remains are to add a few finishing details, the vehicle and figures.

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Domingo Hernández One of the more curious designs by the Russians in

weight, which gave him the advantage of not tip-

the arms race after World War II was the Object 279,

ping over during indirect nuclear explosion, and UFO

whose most outstanding characteristics were the abi-

shaped design to avoid direct impacts.

lity to go through any kind of terrain, its enormous

1 Within the range of brands in the current scale model market, Amusing Hobby is focused on bringing us late WWII from both sides of the Cold War, in this case the Object 279 has been the latest reference, a model with good fit and detail and ideal for showing a true “cold warrior”.

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2 Before starting any painting process it is very important for me to apply surface primer as it helps me to detect any faults and makes the paint adhere better.

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For a base color I applied a couple of coats of Tamiya red primer color covering all of the areas of the upper hull. On the bottom I applied a brown earth color as the basis for further paintwork. A layer of gloss varnish was then applied overall.

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The weathering process will be based largely upon the use of chipping fluids. I began with a layer of Tamiya XF-71 that I distress using a stiff brush moistened with hot water. Once the work on this layer is finished, I spray a layer of gloss varnish to protect this stage of my work. The process was continued with the next layer using Tamiya XF-67, protecting each layer with gloss varnish before moving onto the next. It is important not to completely paint over the areas of prior paint removal allowing areas of the light green and primer red colors to show through.

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Once finished with the chipping process the model is sealed overall using a satin varnish. I began to touch up chipped with the above process with acrylics. Using a fine brush I worked to enhance the wear by adding small chips in light green, dark green and dark brown for the deeper layers. The location of the chips can also be used to enhance and define contours and shapes.

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The same process is repeated to the upper hull, however, in this case white is less evident than on the turret so the application rate of dark brown and green was higher.

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At this point the model was monotonous, even boring if you want to define it, so I started to give some traces and stains in white enamel. The advantage is that the enamels are easily manipulated and have a longer drying time to do streaks, stains and pin washes

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Using artists oils that have first been applied onto a small piece of cardboard in order to soak-up excess oils I begin adding depth and richness to the surfaces. Certain panels are differentiated using subtle color shifts and the corners and recessed areas are darkened to add further contrast.

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The last step is to apply a very diluted coat of Tamiya Deck Tan to the horizontal areas and do pin wash in specific areas around the tank. As you can see here on the turret, the light tan acrylic color aids in the weathering and is very effective in unifying the layers of finish.

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A break in the process to view the turret and open hatches. This photo clearly shows the entire painting process and where we are heading with the weathering.

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Repeating the same process as I used on the turret, I follow the shape of the hull to help dictate were I create the effects of dirt, rust and grease.

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To reinforce white camouflage, snow Signifer, a compound of acrylic resin and a white powder is mixed with an amount of water you want to create a paste. The result is a snow that is very realistic and easy to apply, but should be used sparingly for small drifts in corners.

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The appearance of this artificial snow is matte, so there are two ways to achieve a realistic glisten; you could add a little sparkle to the mix, or use a gloss varnish product to simulate water. I chose the latter because I wanted to represent traces of water also in other areas along the hull. With a small brush simply deposit a drop of varnish on the snow and then draw the remaining moisture downward in vertical lines to create effect of melting snow. Some of these lines can be mixed with earth colored acrylic to simulate water traveling across the dirty surface.

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The general view of the finished model with the completed paint finish. I wanted to give the impression of a tank in use that had pretty much crushed the winter white, I think I got it.

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My friend Jorge Porto painted figure hovering in the tower, alone a masterpiece, it gives the finished tank dynamic appearance, in these pictures you can see all the details that are described at the right paint for me the most important thing is not to cover any of the above processes and give the model an attractive look.

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IN THE NEXT ISSUE...

by the Devil of Modelling

…You smell that? Don’t you just LOVE the smell of turpentine in the morning! I think all of you have experienced that excitement.... the pungent smell of glue and white spirits ... the subtle aroma of acrylic paints mixed with the acrid bite of burning plastic from stretched sprue! Vietnam was a new type of war, of battles fought with helicopter cavalry, state of the art aircraft, artillery batteries, underground bunkers, no front lines, and “grunts” on patrol. Modeling subjects for this theme are as wide-ranging and diverse as the Southeast Asian landscape itself. So, if you think you can hack it, select full-automatic, because we are going to the ‘Nam – and we are going in Hot. To get you FNG types acclimated as you rotate into the ‘NAM, the “Lifers” at AMMO have pulled a scene from the iconic film, Full Metal Jacket. In this scene we witness the REAL exchange between Sgt. Hartman and Pvt. “Cowboy”: Srg: What’s your excuse? Cowboy: sir, excuse for what, sir? Srg: I’m asking the fu**ing questions, do you understand? Cowboy: sir, yes, sir. Srg: Thank you! Can I be in charge for a while? What is the excuse for not finish that fu**ing Dragon M48. Cowboy: sir, I don’t know, sir. Srg: Are you shook up? Nervous? Cowboy: sir, I’m, I cannot understand the instructions sheet, sir! Srg: Do I make you nervous or is it the Dragon’s instructions? Cowboy: sir... Srg: Sir what? Were you about to call me a snap-tite modeler? Cowboy: sir, no, sir!! Srg: Where in hell are you from? Cowboy: sir, from Texas, sir!! Srg: Holy sheepshit! Only steers and Squadron come from Texas, private Cowboy! You don’t look like a steer, so maybe you are one of those who only collect un-built models! Do you spray paint your models? Cowboy: Sir, no, sir! Srg: Are you a rivet counter? Cowboy: Sir, no , sir! Srg: I bet you would screw a person by taking his superglue and not even have the damn common courtesy to give him a replacement! I will be watching you!

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