New Proficiency Reading Teacher s Book

LONGMAN EXAM I . SKILLS Reading Teacher's Bool< Mary Stephens •••1,1 I •• •••••••• Longman ---- Pearson Education Limited Edinburgh Gate Harlow Essex ...

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LONGMAN

EXAM . SKILLS

Reading Teacher's Bool<

Mary Stephens

•••

1,1

•• •• ••••••

I

---Longman

I

Pearson Education Limited Edinburgh Gate Harlow Essex CM20 2JE England and Associated Companies throughout the World www.longman.com © Pearson Education Limited 2002 The right of Mary Stephens to be identified as the author of this Work has been asserted by her in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. All rights reserved; no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise without the prior written permission of the Publishers. ISBN-13: 978-0-582-45101-8 ISBN-10: 0-582-45101-9

Fourth impression 2006 Set in Wilke and Delta

Designed by Studio Image and Photographic Art Edited by Tasia Vassilatou Produced and managed by PROCESS ELT Loukas Ioannou www.geocities.com/process_elt

CONTENTS MAP PAGE

SECTION Reading Paper: an overview

2

New Proficiency

3

Organisation

Reading: an overview

of the book

3

Unit map

4

Developing reading skills

4

Progress Test 1 (Units 1-4)

5

Progress Test 2 (Units 5-8)

7

Progress Test 3 (Units 9-12)

9

Progress Test 4 (Units 13-16)

11

Answer Key

13

Progress Tests Answer Key

28

University of Cambridge Sample Answer Sheet

29

]



The Reading Paper of the Revised Cambridge Proficiency examination tests candidates' ability to understand the meaning of written English at word, phrase, sentence, paragraph and whole text level.



The texts may include extracts from newspapers, magazines, novels and various types of nonfiction material. All are taken from authentic sources and the target audience is always the educated non-specialist reader.



Candidates have 1 hour 30 minutes to complete the Reading Paper.



Candidates mark their answers directly on to the Answer Sheet in pencil. There is an example Answer Sheet on page 29. Part

1

Task type and focus Four-option multiple choice cloze Idioms, collocations, fixed phrases, complementation, phrasal verbs, semantic precision

2

Four-option multiple choice questions Content, detail, opinion, attitude, tone, purpose, main idea, implication, text organisation features (exemplification, comparison, reference)

3

Gapped text Cohesion, coherence, text structure, global meaning

4

Four-option multiple choice Content, detail, opinion, attitude, tone, purpose, main idea, implication, text organisation features (exemplification, comparison, reference)

Task format

Number of words

Three unrelated texts. ~ 375-500 Each text has six gaps and is followed by six multiple choice questions.

Number of questions

Number of marks

18

18

Four texts from different sources, but linked by a theme. There are two multiple choice questions for each text.

600-900

8

16

One text from which seven paragraphs have been removed and placed in jumbled order after the text. Candidates must decide from where in the text the paragraphs have been removed.

800-1100

7

14

700-850

7

14

Total: Approx.

Total:

Total:

40

62

One text with seven multiple-choice questions

3000

~ew

rofLcJelJc~Readiog: an o~erview

New Proficiency Reading offers systematic training in the reading skills required for the Reading Paper of the Revised Cambridge Proficiency examination. Students are guided through strategies that will help them to read texts effectively and answer the exam questions correctly. It includes a wide variety of authentic texts including books (fiction and nonfiction), magazines, newspapers, non-specialist articles from journals, publicity and informational materials (e.g. advertisements, guide books, manuals). These texts accurately reflect the level of the Revised Proficiency examination and cover the major topic areas. New Proficiency Reading also provides comprehensive vocabulary development organised in themes commonly tested in the exam. The tasks in New Proficiency Reading will help students to: •

become familiar with a wide range of sources, registers, topics and lexical fields.



become sensitive to meaning in words and lexical combinations, and phrasal verbs ..



understand



analyse the global organisation



explore the way parts of a text are related, e.g. premise/conclusion.



understand



isolate specific information

including idioms

the overall function and message of texts. of a text.

the gist of a text, even if some words are unknown. in a text.



recognise and evaluate attitude and opinion.



infer underlying meaning in a text.

New Proficiency Reading is divided into four cycles. Each cycle contains four units and provides guidance and practice in all four parts of the Revised Cambridge Proficiency Reading Paper. Each unit focuses on one of the parts in the Reading Paper. The unit always begins with an Exam strategy section in which students learn how to deal with irony and figurative language, how to cope with unfamiliar words, how to infer meaning from the text, etc. By reading through the skills check boxes and working through the tasks in this section, students will become proficient at using the key reading skills needed to tackle the tasks in the examination successfully. The Exam strategy section is followed by an Exam practice section. This contains exam level texts for one of the four parts of the Reading Paper so that students can further consolidate the particular skill they have learnt. Exam tip boxes provide useful hints on the best ways to tackle the Exam practice task. Each unit ends with an extensive Vocabulary development section. This section develops students' range of vocabulary, particularly in such areas as collocation, idioms and expressions, word sets and phrasal verbs.

Unit map

----..

The table below summarises the objectives of each unit section and makes suggestions about the teaching approach and lesson planning.

Unit section

.

Objectives

Assignment.

Exam practice: sl
• To highlight a reading skill and to provide thorough training in it. • To develop an exam strategy by means of a tip box. • To provide thorough practice for the relevant part of the exam.

Exam practice: text(s)

• To provide further practice in a particular reading skill. • To provide practice in the relevant section of the exam.

Text(s) and questions prepared for homework and checked in class.

• To focus on vocabulary from the text(s) of the unit. • To provide contextualised practice on a range of lexical items including collocations, idioms and expressions, etc.

Done in class or can be set for homework.

J)e~eLoping eadlng skUls The skills highlighted in the book are listed below: •

reading for gist



dealing with unfamiliar words



recognising text links



identifying style and tone



reading between the lines



reading for detail



answering multiple choice questions



distinguishing

the literal from the figurative



increasing reading speed



identifying irony

Progress Test 1 (Un'its 1-4) 12

My brother is a real ..... potato. He watches TV all the time! A couch B sofa C armchair D cushion

.

I'm trying to arrange an interview with the editor but it's difficult to ..... him down to an exact time. A stick B fix C pin D glue

13 Don't mention politics to John; it's like a red ..... to a

bull. A cloth Crag

2 It would be nice if I passed my exams but I don't hold ..... much hope. A with B up C out D onto

14

3 After three days in the desert, his mind began to play ..... on him. A games B jokes C tricks D fun

1S Finding the gorillas alive had been ..... his wildest

The girl ..... her friend with her elbow to draw her attention to what was happening. A poked B pointed C nudged D stroked

dreams. A past C beyond

4 Come on. Spill the ..... ! What's the big secret? A peas B beans C milk D dust

B mat D scarf

B beneath D without

16

S Tina and her new classmate are getting on like a ..... on fire. A tree B pan C bush D house

Coming top in the exam was a real ..... in her cap. A feather B plume C badge D medal

17

6 We won't know the ..... extent of the damage for a few days. A full B whole Cutter D absolute

The leopard ..... its prey for hours before it finally went in for the kill. A crouched B crept C scrambled D stalked

18

In spite of his owner's cruelty, the dog ..... no grudge against humans. A takes B bears C carries D supports

19

The rabbits were kept outside the house in a large wooden . A hut B warren C hutch D eyrie

7 Calm down! There's no need to ..... off the handle. A fly B jump C run D leap 8 The claims the woman made had a ..... of truth about them. A ring B mark D circle C shade

20 Dave keeps going on about the evils of modern

9 You haven't signed a contract yet, so it's not too late to back ..... the deal. B down from A into C away from D out of 10

Stop beating about the ..... and say what you really mean! A table B boat C bush D plot

11 Please don't ..... fun at me all the time!

A push C pitch

B poke D prod

farming; he's got a real ..... in his bonnet about it. A ant B bee C spider D wasp 21 Brenda has an amazing appetite. She eats like a A horse B wolf C whale D lion 22 The keeper grabbed the lion cub by the ..... of its neck. A mane B fur C scruff D hide

.

23 Don't trust him. He's a real snake in the A nest B grass C bush D hole

35 The rooms had just been cleaned

.

span. A spit C spick

24 By any ..... , a zoo keeper's job is a difficult one. A reasons B levels C standards D limits 25 Unless we act now, gorillas will become without a ..... of doubt.

..... and

B spin D speck

36 We're so busy at work that I have ..... booking holiday for the time being. A refrained B put off

extinct,

C held over

a

D waited

37 We ..... the coastline and then headed inland.

B tinge

A hint C ghost

and looked

A skirted C outlined

D shadow

26 As the weather was bad, the tourists whiled time strolling round the local shops. A in B off Cup D away

B sided D edged

..... the 38 Don't let the tour operators take you ..... with their sales patter. None of it is true! A down Bin C along

D about

27 It took us some time to get to ..... with the crisis. A tongs C grips

39 Because of bad weather, A undue

B claws D tacks

C overdue 28 Fiona's

enthusiasm

for natural

history

D belated to travel are few and far ..... in my

profession. A between C beyond

B holds D knows

C sees

.

..... no 40 Opportunities

bounds. A recognises

Samantha's flight was B unpunctual

29 The travel company went to ..... lengths to make their clients feel at home. B great A major D strong C far

B off D away

41 We need to come ..... the problem angle. A to Cat

from a different

Bon

D by

30 Young people have a ..... to go rather wild while on holiday. A tendency C problem 31 We were completely

42 Tom revealed his ..... for writing at a very early age. A faculty B craft C expertise D gift

B habit D characteristic

43 I'm pleased A bouncing

..... when we saw the terrible

state of our hotel. A taken away C taken in

Chopping

B taken aback D taken away

32 By an unfortunate ..... , the tour company omitted John's name from their list. A neglect B disregard C insult

..... accommodation. A makeshift C brief

D prancing

44 It's a long time since you saw her but this photo ..... your memory. A jog B juggle C jostle Djam

had

may

D oversight 45 The old lady dislocated to a wheelchair.

33 The Embassy ..... against travelling in the remoter parts of the country. B advises A emphasises C declares D maintains 34 The hotel was flooded,

to say that the baby is ..... with health! B skipping

so the tourists B conditional D tentative

were housed

A hip C knuckle

in

her ..... , so she was confined B thigh D calf

Progress Test 2 (Units 5-8) •

Choose the best answer, A, B, C or D.

13 An apology would go a long ..... towards healing his wounded pride. A time B way C distance D road

Are you ..... for your driving test soon? A going on B going out C going in D going after

14 I ran ..... one of your friends at the disco last night.

2 The stunt man ..... off his injury and fmished the scene. A shrugged B threw C carried D put 3 The painter said that early failure had only ..... him on to greater efforts. A inspired B encouraged C spurred D approved 4 The actress is ..... starring in a new musical. A lately B recently C presently D currently

A over C by

B off D into

1S I wish you'd stop being such a wet ..... and join in the fun! A blanket B sheet C towel D pillow 16 It's no ..... my trying to learn Latin; it's just too

difficult for me. A worth C good

B point D reason

17 At a ..... guess, I'd say that Shakespeare

S I recognise that singer's face but his name ..... me. A fails B evades C deludes D escapes

35 plays. A brief C ready

wrote about

Brough D round

6 After the first half hour of the play, time began to . A delay B drag D relax C extend

18 No matter how angry you are, you should never .....

7 I wish the actors would speak up. I can't make ..... what they're saying. Bout Aup C off Dover

19 You shouldn't A prowl C proceed

to violence. A exert C recourse

B resort D resolve ..... into other people's private lives. B prod D pry

20 I'm not surprised you can't find your notes. Your desk 8 Some romantic novelists ..... out books with the same old formula every year. B spill A churn D pour C ladle

is ..... with papers! A muddled C cluttered 21 The windscreen

9 Take it easy! There's no need to make such a ..... and dance about it. A tune B song C verse Ddrum

accident. A shattered C tattered

B bundled D burdened

of the school minibus was ..... in the B tangled D dented

22 The head teacher has asked me to take the new boy 10 The book was really funny - it had me ..... stitches.

A in Cat

Bon D into

11 Don't believe him! He's just ..... your leg. A shaking B pulling C poking D kicking 12 We were ..... stiff as we walked through

streets at midnight. A scared C feared

B frightened D terrified

under my ..... and look after him. A wing B arm C cloak D sleeves

23 You've signed the contract, so it's too late to back ..... now. A on C out

B away Dup

the deserted 24 He will be sued for ..... of contract if he does not do what he promised. A fracture B crack C rupture D breach

25 That firm is a leader in the ..... of engineering. A field B area C topic D background

36 The muggers got ..... away with my bag.

26 The documents vanished into ..... air. A clean B pure C thin D clear

·37 Did he die of natural causes, or do the police suspect

foul ..... '? A game C act

27 In spite of working their fingers to the ..... , all the staff were made redundant. A nail B edge C flesh D bone 28 He was forced to sell the business ..... a loss. A at B for C with Don 29 Tom became very embittered when he was passed ..... for promotion. B off Aup Dover C down 30 Until business improves, the firm are only going to employ a ..... staff. B bare A skeleton D limited C reduced 31

A completely Chard

It is ..... surprising that the company folded after all the problems they had. A scarcely B rarely C aptly D justly

B long D clean

B play D crime

38 I had some time to ..... , so I went and looked round the shops. A attack Bhang C strangle D kill 39 That judge is feared because she takes a hard ..... in the fight against drugs. A line Blane C path D rule 40 The detective saw ..... the deception very quickly. A through B past C into D round 41 The man was ..... guilty of theft.

A condemned C found

B accused D convicted

42 There has been a(n) ..... of thefts in the town recently.

A rate C tide

B influx D spate

43 Tom is determined to ..... his name and prove his

innocence. A reprieve C wipe

32 Sandra's ..... sin is pride. A redeeming B overriding C besetting D overwhelming 33 Ben's success threatened to go to his A mind B senses C head D brains

.

34 Sheila was tempted to ..... in her notice straightaway.

A put C sign

B write D hand

35 The director tried to oppose the merger but it went ..... in the end. A over B ahead Dup Con

B liberate D clear

44 My uncle has been ..... from driving for a year. A forbidden B banned C excluded D expelled 45 The suspect is being kept in police ..... while they

question her further about the murder. A custody B guard C control D care

Progress Test 3 (Units 9-12) 14

It was ..... dark in the cave. A jet B coal C dark D pitch 2 There is a ..... possibility that life will be found on Mars. B distinct A plain C full D sharp 3 The company was fined for failing to ..... with the law. A comply B obey C abide D acquiesce 4 His research ..... the way for further discoveries. A granted B planted C paved D laid 5 Testing drugs on animals is considered to be a necessary ..... by some scientists. A sin Bevil C shame D wrong 6 I think I have done enough revision but the acid ..... will come when I sit the exam. A proof B test C result D answer 7 The portrait has been attributed ..... a Dutch master. A about B for C to Din 8 I'm not prepared to put ..... this noise any longer. A up with B up C down to D in for 9 You look as ..... as a fiddle! A funny B fit C fat D free 10

I wish my little sister weren't such a pain in the ..... ! A head B heart C foot D neck

11 If you lay a ..... on my brother, I'll call the police.

A finger C foot 12

B touch D scratch

You should never look a gift ..... in the mouth. A dog B sheep C horse D cow

13 I thought something terrible had happened but it was

- all a ..... in a teacup. A storm C breeze

B gale D wind

He put his life in ..... by driving so fast. A stake B hazard C risk D jeopardy

15 When it ..... to creative writing, he's a genius!

A turns C falls

Breaches D comes

16

Never in my ..... dreams did I imagine that this would happen! A greatest B maddest C wildest D best

17

They robbed the bank and made ..... with a great deal of money. A away B off C out Dup

18

She was furious and looked ..... at him. A daggers B knives C swords D blades

19 Sharon was ..... to eat the cake but she managed to

stop herself. A induced C attracted

B tempted D persuaded

20 They ..... me off in that boutique! Things are much

cheaper in the shop down the road. A tore B pulled C ripped D dragged 21

Sharing the housework is part and ..... of getting married. A burden B packet C load D parcel

22 Clare has always had a ..... on her shoulder about not going to university. A cut B mark C stain D chip 23 Peter is finding it very hard to ..... to married life.

A adjust C concur

B reconcile D accord

24 The thief gave the police the ..... and escaped.

A run C turn

B slip D edge

25 It was a cruel ..... of fate. A twist B screw C turn D leap 26 Petra gets very nervous on public occasions - she can

hardly ..... two words together. A line B rope C string D pleat

27 Her nerves were torn to

A slits C strips

. B parts D shreds

28 A cure for cancer may soon be within our

A clutch C clasp

37 The news that the company is to close ..... as no

surprise to me. A comes C occurs

B happens D appears

. 38 When people live in such close ..... to each other,

B grip D grasp

there are bound to be occasional problems. A neighbourhood B vicinity C position D proximity

29 Investigators are trying to ..... more light on the causes of the crash. B shed A shine C reflect D direct

39 Our rivals are making a takeover ..... for our firm. A offer B attempt C bid D deal

30 We need to ..... out a few problems before launching 40 I'm afraid astronomy is a ..... book to me; I don't

the product on the market. A flatten B tidy C iron D clear 31 The idea of going into business ..... no appeal

me. A makes C provides

understand it at all. A shut C spent

B closed D dull

for 41 We saw ..... details of the disaster on television

B holds D consists

last night. A elaborate C graphic

B knotty D burning

32 It is standard ..... for the company to refuse to give

refunds without a receipt. A routine B custom C practice D process 33 Mter months of failure, the company finally ..... on a brilliant idea. A hit B burst C struck D shot

42 The painting Sonya entered in the competition put

mine in the A shade C shadow

. B dark D dusk

43 Our teacher is wonderful - she can put ..... the most

difficult subject really clearly. A out Bon C forward Dover

34 Although cautious in their approach, the production

team is always ..... to new ideas. A open B enthusiastic C welcome D eager 3S If you want a good camera, there's nothing I .....

more highly than this model. A recommend B propose C advise D applaud 36 The results of the inquiry may lend ..... to the claims made by the scientist. A gravity B depth C weight D volume

44 My great-grandmother is as ..... as a post. A blind B daft C deaf D lame 4S When the stunt man heard what he had to do, he didn't turn a ..... ! B head A heel C finger D hair

Progr~ss Test 4 (Units 13-16) Tragedy ..... yesterday when a man was swept out to sea by a freak wave. A struck B sparked Chit D came 2 I'm feeling a bit ..... the weather today. A over B under C below D above

14

My mother has to put ..... with all my bad habits. A by B up C through D round

15

It is important we do not ..... the wrong conclusions from these experiments. A jump B draw C take D gather

16 The ..... were stacked against them but they survived

their ordeal. A fates C odds

3 Are you having second ..... about going to the party? A thoughts B plans C intentions D ideas 17

The lizard ..... in the warmth of the early morning sun. A enjoyed B relished C basked D absorbed

18

I eat sensibly and try to ..... clear of junk food. A wind B drive C move D steer

19

The ambulance arrived in the ..... of time. A nick B stroke C point D heat

4 Sam has turned over a new ..... ; he's a little angel these days! B life A leaf C road D page 5 I'm going to ..... in my mother's footsteps. A follow B march C walk D go 6 Let's have a drink to ..... the ice before we start the meeting. B split A shatter C break D fracture

20 The manager turned on her ..... and stormed out of

the office. A foot C step

7 I caught the train by the ..... of my teeth. A edge B run C white D skin 21

8 Cloning is a ..... debated issue. A deeply B hotly C profoundly D heavily

A baseless C groundless

B pointless D aimless

He won't take responsibility for the disaster. He will try to pass the . A fault B burden C buck D problem

A belief C principle

.

B conscience D theory

23 She's threatening to cause trouble but I think we should ..... her bluff. A make B do C see D call

Kate wears her heart on her . A jacket. B bracelet Chat D sleeve

11 Your fears about the future are often completely

B heel D spot

22 I'm a vegetarian. I refuse to eat meat on

9 I guessed that answer but it was just a ..... in the dark. A jump B shot D slap C leap 10

B hopes D chances

.

24 The new shopping centre looks awful! In my opinion,

it's a blot ..... the landscape. A in Bon Cat D for

12 Stick to your ..... and don't let anyone change your

mind. A bullets C guns

B weapons D pistols

25 I wish you wouldn't ..... up a fuss about such a minor mistake! A take B make D beat C kick

13 I am not persuaded that our best interests ..... in

developing new technologies like that. A lie Brest C centre D stand

26 Although we agree on the main issues, we still differ

on some ..... of detail. A lists C points

B items D articles

27 Plans to build a new shopping centre have been .....

by the local authorities. A put down C turned down

B run down D talked down

37 The car crashed because someone had ..... with the

brakes. A serviced C tampered

B altered D tricked

28 I thought I'd lost my wallet but it turned ..... in the end. B over Ain Dup C by

38 Our plan failed, so it's back to the drawing ..... , I'm afraid! A room B board C table D pin

29 I hate people who sit on the ..... and never take a position on an issue. A sofa B fence C bench D bank

39 I don't know what our guests will want to do this

30 They've decided to ..... the hatchet and make up their

40 I hope all your hard work ..... fruit.

quarrel. A pass C bury

Bcarry D drop

weekend. We'll have to play it by A ear B eye C mouth D hand

A brings C makes

.

B has D bears

41 Fossils like this are only discovered once in a ..... 31 It's too late to do anything now. You've ..... the boat,

I'm afraid. A lost C sunk

B missed D forgotten

moon. A red C yellow

B blue D pink

42 We'll have to burn the midnight ..... if we want to

32 When I said I could do the job, I probably bit off more than I could . A swallow Beat C devour D chew

finish this project on time. A oil B coal C fire D spirit 43 When I started to study archaeology, I knew ..... no

33 That's not real - it's just a ..... of your imagination. A bit B figure C picture D figment 34 Martha was very upset. I think she was on the ..... of

tears when I left. A edge C side

B verge D margin

35 Sarah thinks she can set the world to ..... all by herself. B fairness A justice D principles C rights 36 Who was the first person to ..... the Egyptian hieroglyphic script? B decipher A decode D delineate C deconstruct

Latin, but within a year I could read it rather well. A barely B entirely C scarcely D virtually 44 The historian has just brought ..... a book on the

Second World War. Aup C out

Bon Dover

45 When I was a teenager, I had a ..... on one of my

teachers. A fondness C fancy

B passion D crush

Answer I
Similar but different

(p. 8)

1 emanate; 2 let; 3 dead; 4 sorely; 5 modest; 6 turn; 7 on the grounds; 8 keeping; 9 sharp; 10 assigning

E)~arnstrate.gy,· PaLLl

a

(pp.. 4-5J

(p. 4)

m

Phrasal verbs with hold (p. 9) 1 held down; 2 held up; 3 hold (you) to; 4 hold onto; 5 hold up; 6 hold out; 7 hold with; 8 is holding (it) against; 9 held up; 10 holding out for

Number 2 is the best summary.

m

(p.4) Question Question Question

m 1 = a 2 = b 3 = e

Question 4 = c Question 5 = a Question 6 = d

Common expressions (p. 9) 1 d; 2 a; 3 h; 4 c; 5 g; 6 b; 7 f; 8 e; 9 j;

It is about the qualities that a good newspaper editor needs.

burnt his boats beat about the bush bites/bit the dust do a bunk jump the gun fly off the handle is barking up the wrong tree calling a spade a spade Spill the beans 10 is jumping on the bandwagon

o

o

Ii (p.5) 1 B; 2 C; 3 A; 4 B; 5 D; 6 C

m

(p.5)

(p. 5)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

1 C; 2 A D(p.5) 3 A; 4 B; 5 C; 6 C

p-OJILP.tactice·

10 Reporting the news (p. 6) 1 C; 2 B; 3 D; 4 A; 5 D;

11 6 B

Taste (p. 6) 7 D; 8 C; 9 B; 10 A; 11 C; 12 D Lost in the tangled forest (p. 7) 13 B; 14 A; 15 D; 16 A; 17 D;

18 C

12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19

20

Similes (p. 10>

like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like like

a hawk a Trojan a bad penny a house on fire a bull in a china shop a bear with a sore head a ton of bricks a sieve a trooper wildfire a red rag to a bull water off a duck's back a rhinoceros looking for a needle in a haystack a log a shot the back of his hand a drowned rat a Cheshire cat something the cat brought in

D Prepositions

a

Descriptive adjectives (p. 8)

1 unbending; 2 satirical; 3 condescending; 4 menacing; 5 flippant; 6 antagonistic; 7 biased; 8 grudging; 9 sceptical; 10 overbearing

10 i

(p. 11)

1 for; 2 about; 3 of; 4 out; 8 in; 9 with; 10 in

5 of; 6 off; 7 at;

m

Collocations (p. 11) 1 e; 2 f; 3 a; 4 g; 5 d; 6 c; 7 h; 8 b

1 wonder woman; 2 plastic surgeon; 3 tin god; 4 casualty department; 5 game show; 6 tabloid newspaper; 7 obstacle course; 8 couch potato

The writer exaggerates to bring out the humour of the situation.

Cp. 13) 1 B; 2 C

Killer whales Cp. 14)

1 A; 2 D Dolphin talk Cp. 15) 3 C; 4 B Play - fun or primitive

rJ (p.

12)

Author of text:

Attenborough, Sir David (born 1926) English naturalist and broadcaster, born in London. Well-known for his documentary film-making, including series which have been immensely popular worldwide like 'Life on Earth' and 'The Living Planet'.

(p. 12)

2

3

4

5

instinct? Cp. 16)

5 C; 6D

The vocabulary in Text 1is fairly technical (as shown by words like 'ossicles' and 'scutes'). In Text 2 it is not technical. In Text 1there is one very complex sentence (the last sentence). In Text 2 the sentences are not complex. Text 1was written to inform. Text 2 was written both to inform and also to appeal to the reader's emotions. Text 1is written for either the specialist or the interested layman. Text 2 is written for the general reader. In Text 1the author's style is neutral and factual. In Text 2 it is more emotive. (p. 13)

Author of text:

Durrell, Gerald (1925-1995) Author and naturalist. 'My Family and Other Animals' and other novels describe his childhood in Corfu. He founded the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust, which has made an important contribution to the preservation of endangered species. Brother of novelist Laurence Durrell.

Animal intelligence 7 B; 8 C

rJ

Animal

groups

Cp. 17)

Cp. 18>

1 d/f; 2 c; 3 e; 4 b; 5 f; 6 a

Animal homes Cp. 18>

1 d; 2 f; 3 a; 4 b; 5 g; 6 e; 7 h; 8 c

g Animal

families Cp. 18) 1 f; 2 d; 3 a; 4 b; 5 c; 6 e

III Parts of an animal's

body Cpp. 18-19)

a 1 b; 2 h; 3 f; 4 j;

b 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

5 g; 6 i; 7 a; 8 c; 9 d; 10 e

the scales dropped from her eyes his jaw dropped by the skin of her teeth has got her claws into The fur began to fly a feather in his cap I haven't seen hide nor hair of ruffled Fiona's feathers

D Similar

Cp. 13) Students should underline the following: ... I realised I was rearing a monster. Potsil lived to eat and would fall upon anything, living or dead, that came within reach. There was nothing he would not throw himself onto with screams of joy, ... as being inedible. His greatest ambition in life was to consume a human being ... beyond his abilities.

but different Cp. 19) 1 untold; 2 carcass; 3 contribution; 4 lethal; 5 virulent; 6 reputed; 7 successor; 8 notoriously; 9 banned; 10 coaxed; 11 in retrospect; 12 face to face

o

Prepositions Cp. 19)

1 under; 2 without; 3 below; 6 beneath; 7 within; 8 in

4 beyond;

5 over;

m

Ways of communicating

(p. 20)

a

b 1 purred; 2 droned; 3 croaked; 4 whining; 5 roaring; 6 growled

m

Phrasal verbs with take (p. 20) 1 be taken in; 2 took (it) in; 3 take out (your bad mood) on; 4 took (it) on/upon; 5 take to; 6 has taken up/took up; 7 was taken aback; 8 take off; 9 takes after; 10 took down

assume a posture

nod one's head rear offspring

exchange a glance

sound the alarm

inflict a wound

stifle a yawn

jog somebody's memory take a hint make a stab (at)

utter a sound

o

(p. 21)

Verbs of movement

1 stalked; 2 leapt/leaped; 3 crept; 4 scrambled; 5 pounced; 6 lurking; 7 crouched

III Similar

but different (p. 21) 1 drawing; 2 casts; 3 lightning; 4 mixed; 5 scruff; 6 aback; 7 prey; 8 goose; 9 newly; 10 fittest

.ExallLslraleQ-y,·

e.art3 lPP. 2~23J

(p. 22)

Author of text:

Theroux, Paul Edward (born 1941) American novelist and travel writer. He has travelled widely through Asia and America. He is an intelligent, witty observer of life in these countries.

m

m

(p. 23)

B was not needed. The only person in the main text to which 'He' in the first sentence could refer is the one before gap 3. However, Paragraph B cannot fit here because the paragraph immediately after begins: 'Yet this old train ... '. Therefore the missing paragraph must make reference to a train rather than to a person.

p..am practice: Part 3 (P12. 24-25~

a

(p. 22)

Author of text:

Thubron, Colin (born 1939) Left publishing to travel. Has written four highly praised novels and several award-winning travel books.

Verb and noun collocations (p. 20)

bear a resemblance

a

(p. 23)

1 C; 2 A; 3 D

buzz: bee, bumblebee croak: frog drone: bee growl: dog, lion, tiger, bear purr: cat roar: big cat (e.g. lion, tiger) whine: dog

o

m

(p. 22)

1 oil; 2 smoke; 3 slopes; 4 wood; 5 clean; 6 sound/noise; 7 fall/break; 8 prehistoric; 9 wind; 10 flood

a

Words from the text (p. 26) 1 c; 2 i; 3 h; 4 g; 5 f; 6 d; 7 e; 8 j; 9 b; 10 a

m

Descriptive verbs (p. 26) 1 spewed; 2 choked; 3 banked; 4 trickled; 5 jostled; 6 scattered; 7 bowled; 8 lingered

m

Travelling and transport

(p. 26)

People: conductor, motorist, skipper Cars: bonnet, boot, convertible, hatchback, lay-by Trains: buffet car, compartment, sidings, sleeping car Boats: berth, deck, galley, gangplank, jetty, liner, mast, moorings, rudder, schooner Planes: cockpit, fuselage, galley, landing-bay, runway, standby

m

Prepositions (p. 27) 1 off; 2 against; 3 at; 4 behind; 5 below; 6 on; 7 out of; 8 over; 9 under; 10 up to

o 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Idioms and expressions with go (p. 28>

gone downhill go halves will go spare went by the board went to pieces go the whole hog goes off at a tangent it went against the grain went blank 10 went to great lengths

o

Phrasal verbs with go (p. 28> 1 go about; 2 go on at; 3 go over; 4 went down with; 5 have (really) gone off; 6 went in for; 7 go along with; 8 go through with; 9 went through; 10 went for

l!J

Collocations with adjectives (p. 29) 1 wild; 2 lost; 3 tall; 4 rude; 5 close; 6 far; 7 final; 8 foregone; 9 going; 10 narrow; 11 near; 12 long

m

(p. 31>

Subject of text:

Dahl, Roald (1916-1990) British children's author and short story writer. Born in Wales, of Norwegian parents. Among the most popular children's authors of all time. His stories are often anarchic and quite violent. Many of his books have been made into films. 'Boy' is autobiographical.

II(p. 31) 1 d; 2 c; 3 d; 4 c

Gl 1 2 3 4 5 6

Expressions with and (p. 29)

bits and pieces bright and early give and take hustle and bustle odds and ends part and parcel

7 peace and quiet 8 rack and ruin 9 safe and sound 10 short and sweet 11 touch and go 12 whys and wherefores

o

(p. 31> 1 a; 2 d

ExaJ1]JJ1.actLce:atU (PJ)--3k33) A radical multimillionaire Subject of text:

Roddick, Anita (born 1956) Highly successful English retail entrepreneur. Founded 'The Body Shop' with her husband Thomas Gordon. The shops sell cosmetics made from natural materials. There are over 100 stores in the UK and at least twice as many in other countries.

F KC!!J1

sirale-9Y: Part 4

rJ (p. 30> Author of text:

Bennett, Alan (born 1934) English dramatist, actor and director. He has written many plays for TV. 'The Lady in the Van', a true account of his experiences with a homeless woman who came to live in his street, is included in his autobiography.

I]] (p. 30>

rJ

Similar but different (p. 34) 1 shrugged; 2 crumpled; 3 skin; 4 breed; 5 barrage; 6 stick; 7 had; 8 scent; 9 giggle; 10 messy

I]]

Opposites (p. 34) 1 a; 2 d; 3 e; 4 g; 5 h; 6 i; 7 c; 8 b; 9 f; 10 j

caution = the quality of using great care and attention

m

peak = the flat curved part of a cap which sticks out in front above the eyes

hem = the edge of a piece of cloth that is turned under and sewn down, especially the lower edge of a dress or skirt

Character adjectives (p. 35) 1 positive; 2 positive; 3 negative; 4 positive; 5 negative; 6 positive; 7 positive; 8 negative; 9 negative; 10 negative; 11 negative; 12 negative; 13 negative; 14 positive; 15 positive; 16 positive; 17 negative; 18 negative; 19 positive or negative; 20 positive; 21 negative; 22 positive; 23 negative; 24 positive

m

Idioms with parts of the body (p. 35)

1 2 3 4 S 6 7 8 9

has got a good head on his shoulders put his foot in it didn't lift a finger see eye to eye 're head over heels in love keep your chin up haven't (got) the guts cost an arm and a leg 're (just) pulling your leg 10 is on its last legs

III Expressions

and idioms (p. 36)

1 2 3 4

S 6 7 8

question call scratch pinch

D Phrasal

grain rut cuff dumps

verbs with come (p. 36)

1 2 3 4 S 6 7 8 9

come out with came across come up against come about came through came down come round to came into come up with 10 comes/came across as 11 came down with 12 come up to

= (for clothes), fitting part of the body very or too closely. The other adjectives describe clothes which are not tight and do not fit closely. 10 dawdle = to waste time; to move or do something very slowly. The other verbs describe ways of moving very fast or in a hurry. 11 vivacious = full of life and high spirits. The other adjectives are associated with tiredness. 12 down in the dumps = sad; depressed. The other expressions are associated with being very happy or pleased. 13 grin = to make a wide smile. The other verbs are connected with bad temper and unpleasant feelings. 14 squat = to sit on a surface with the knees bent and the legs drawn fully up under the body. The other verbs are ways of looking, not sitting. 9 tight

CI Expressions

with come (p. 37) come down to earth take each day as it comes do not know if I am coming or going came/comes as no surprise has been coming apart at the seams came to life came to a head come clean have (always) come easily 10 come what may

1 2 3 4 S 6 7 8 9

m

Similar words (p. 37) 1 childlike = like a child. The other adjectives describe

behaviour in adults which in some negative way resembles a child's. 2 canny = clever, careful and not easily deceived. The other adjectives are associated with kindness or goodness. 3 modest = having or expressing a lower opinion of one's own ability than is probably deserved. The other adjectives are all connected with arrogance. 4 planned = organised; pre-arranged. The other adjectives and expressions are associated with doing something on the spur of the moment, without planning for it in any way. S sane = healthy in mind; not mad. The other adjectives are all connected with madness. 6 skip = to move in a light, dancing way, with quick steps and jumps. The other verbs describe ways of moving with difficulty. 7 pressed = ironed; made flat. The other adjectives describe the state of material or clothes which are full of folds because they have been crushed. 8 jodhpurs = special trousers for horse riding. The other nouns refer to footwear.

Exam strate~Y..:..E.art J.pp,.,38- t9J

rJ (p.

38)

a 1 on; 2 to; 3 to; 4 at; S to; 6 with; 9 with; 10 on

7 on; 8 of;

b 1 f; 2 i; 3 j; 4 c; S h; 6 e; 7 g; 8 a; 9 b; 10 d

m (p. 39) 1 b; 2 b; 3 a; 4 b; S a; 6 b; 7 b; 8 a; 9 a; 10 b

ExaJJl.pract· ce· Becoming a pop idol (p. 40>

1 B; 2 D; 3 A; 4 C; S A; 6 D Children's authors (p. 41> 7 D; 8 B; 9 A; 10 C; 11 C; 12 D

Digging for dinosaur fossils (p. 41)

13 D; 14 C; 15 A; 16 B; 17 D; 18 C

UNIT

L

m

Expressions and idioms connected with music (p. 42)

1 music; 2 song; 3 tune; 4 drum; 5 tune; 6 song; 7 harping; 8 fiddle; 9 drum; 10 tune

m

Expressions with be (p. 42) 1 e; 2 f; 3 h; 4 i; 5 c; 6 a; 7 d; 8 j; 9 b; 10 g

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

is/will be in for are (always) at each others' throats is/was at pains to was in on will belis plain sailing am up to my eyes are after were beside themselves is/will be up against 10 will be/are over the hill

B Similar

but different

(p. 43)

1 thereby; 2 meticulous; 3 offence; 4 ended up; 5 notwithstanding; 6 stroke; 7 sketch; 8 stamp; 9 something; 10 confronted

m

(I1P_o

46-4D

m

(p. 46) 1 no; 2 no; 3 no The answer to all three questions is no. The writer is being ironic when talking about the conditions under which the pupils are expected to play rugby. In fact, they do not enjoy playing rugby on a cold winter day while wearing inadequate clothing to protect them from the rain and winter weather.

m (p.

46)

1 The second text 2 The first text

I] (p.

46)

The first text might come from a magazine, a book of essays or humorous articles, a novel, a biography or an autobiography. The second text might come from a novel, a biography or autobiography.

D (p. 47> Cinema and theatre terms (p. 43)

1 dubbed; 2 prompt; 3 clips; 4 screenplay; 5 rehearsal, understudy; 6 sketch, asides; 7 trailer; 8 shoot, props; 9 set, extras; 10 fake

I] Expressions

and idioms with make and

do (p. 44)

1 make; 2 make; 3 done; 4 made; 5 doing; 6 make; 7 make; 8 done; 9 done; 10 made

D Prepositions

(p. 44)

1 on; 2 off; 3 in; 4 under; 8 over; 9 up; 10 above

5 By; 6 below; 7 at;

m 1 2 3 4

ExaJtLSix.ate-9Y..: Part 2

Collocations (p. 45) froze their blood pulling your leg strike lucky melted (John's) heart

5 6 7 8

made a fortune take sides call (George's) bluff catches my eye

1 probably true; 2 probably true; 3 probably true; 4 probably true

m

(p. 47> Students should underline the following: 1 I have the gTeatest Tespect fOT the univeTsity and its 800 yeaTs of tiTeless intellectual toil 2 it seems to me that when a nation's industTial pTOwess has plunged so low that it is Teliant on KOTean fiTms fOT its futuTe economic secuTity, ... 3 a tad indulgent in a countTy with thTee million unemployed and whose last gTeat invention was eat's eyes? 4 but I must confess that I'm not entiTely cleaT what it's fOT, now that BTitain no 10ngeT needs colonial administratoTs who can quip in Latin.

m

(p. 47> 1 A; 2 C

m

Phrasal verbs with run (p. 45) 1 ran into; 2 running down; 3 run over; 4 ran into; 5 ran off; 6 ran off with; 7 run out of; 8 ran acrosslinto

Latin - hard labour? (p. 48)

1 B; 2 D

Early memories Author of text:

(p. 49)

Cl

Lee, Laurie (1914-1997) English poet and author. Educated in a village school in Stroud, Gloucestershire. His travels in many parts of the world are the subject of much of his writing. He is widely acclaimed for his evocation of his rural childhood in his autobiographical novel 'Cider with Rosie'.

Prepositions (p. 55) 1 on; 2 to; 3 through; 4 on; 5 at; 6 on; 7 in; 8 on; 9 in; 10 by

o

Phrasal verbs with fall (p. 55) 1 falling over; 2 fell for; 3 fell out; 4 fell behind; 5 fell through; 6 fall in with; 7 fell on; 8 didn't fall for; 9 fell about; 10 fell apart

Chewing gum (p. 50>

5 C; 6 B The new tutor (p. 51) 7 D; 8 B

)/ocabuJary, develQPJJJeJJ! (pp. 52-55J rJ Similar 1 2 3 4 5

a a a a a

m

m

words (p. 52)

expelled; diploma; cramming; trial; subjects;

b b b b b

suspended degree revise competition themes

Similar but different

(p. 52)

1 emit; 2 discharged; 3 imbue; 6 extolled; 7 evade; 8 adopt

g Adjective

4 instil;

5 rebuffed;

and noun collocations (p. 53)

1 hard; 2 thorough; 3 broken; 5 lasting; 6 formative

(p. 56)

which = several key technologies this marvel of science = virtual reality this = somewhere completely different one = a place ones = goggles them = complex tasks these = virtual reality cockpits them = pilots the latter = the patients this sphere = the field of virtual reality technology

m

(p. 57> 1 B; 2 D; 3 C; 4 A

4 incorrigible;

m

Expressions to describe people (p. 53)

o

Expressions with

1 nosey; 2 stuffed; 3 smart; 4 live; 5 armchair; 6 soft; 7 fair-weather; 8 wet

1 2 3 4 5

run (p.

53)

ran him to ground/earth run away with the idea/notion runs counter to My blood ran cold were running riot

D Words

connected

with light and water (p. 54)

Light: gleam, glint, glow, sparkle, twinkle, wink Water: drip, gush, pour, spill, sprinkle, trickle

[is Similar

but different

(p. 54)

1 thorough; 2 assuming; 3 put; 4 overdue; 5 helping out; 6 refrain; 7 shouted; 8 dependent on; 9 incentive; 10 provision

)Locabulary-!ie)le1o-pment rJ Jobs and equipment

Cp 60-

(p. 60>

a 1 easel; 2 chisel; 3 tripod;

4 spanner;

5 scalpel

b 1 E; 2 A; 3 B; 4 D; 5 C

m

Aspects of employment (p. 60> 1 redundancy package; 2 petty cash; 3 freelance; 4 workload; 5 the dole; 6 merger; 7 pension; 8 workforce; 9 overtime, backlog; 10 trade union

m

Common

work-related

expressions (p. 61)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

will show you the ropes are in the black have entered into negotiations gets a foot on the ladder is not within my field take up a new post is a dogsbody was passed over for promotion a breach of contract 10 pulled rank

Phrasal verbs with break (p. 61) 1 broke off; 2 break up; 3 break up; 4 broke out; 5 broke into; 6 break in on; 7 broke out; 8 broken down; 9 broke through; 10 broke away; 11 breaking down; 12 broke out

(p. 62) 1 cluttered; 2 not; 3 speculation; 4 beneficial; 5 grievance; 6 scope; 7 Were; 8 trends Similar but different

D Collocations

with adjectives (p. 62) 1 vicious; 2 sure-fire; 3 skeleton; 4 rough; 5 snap; 6 flying; 7 golden; 8 star; 9 dead-end; 10 vested

m

Similar but different (p. 63) 1 bones; 2 waffle; 3 virtual; 4 harm; 5 out; 6 smuggle; 7 fell; 8 off; 9 out; 10 leave

m

Prepositions (p. 63)

1 in; 2 on; 3 out; 4 on; 5 in; 6 about; 8 off; 9 through; 10 for

(p. 64) 1 Yes, she is suggestible. The girl believes that she can sense the 'Whistler' following her. The creature, man or beast, crouching in the undergrowth was already sniffing her fear, waiting until her panic broke. Then she would hear the crash of the breaking bushes, his pounding feet, feel his panting breath hot on her neck. 2 No, she is not walking through a built-up area in a city. The text mentions: 'the soft, rich-smelling earth', 'the undergrowth', 'the breaking bushes'.

m

o

m

7 on;

3 No, it is the girl's imagination that leads her to believe that there is someone hiding in the bushes. This impression is given to the reader by the use of the words 'would hear'. She would hear the crash of the breaking bushes ... 4 No, her parents do not know what she has been doing tonight. Please God, let me get safely home and I'll never lie again. 5 Yes, she is out later than usual. I'll always leave on time. This suggests that she did not, in fact, leave on time. 6 Yes, the figure ahead of her may not be as innocent and comforting as she thinks. The writer implies that the appearance of the figure is too good to be true; that the figure appeared from nowhere and it is unlikely that someone else would be out walking so late. And then, miraculously, her prayer was answered. Suddenly, about thirty yards ahead of her, there was a woman. She didn't question how, so mysteriously, this slim, slow-walking figure had materialised.

m

(p. 65) He was afraid of the dark walk up the drive to the house.

m

(p. 65)

1 no; 2 no; 3 He would not have understood boy's real fear. 4 his parents

o

the

(p. 65)

C

,ExaULslrategy': at,lA (p-p~6 -65)

D (p. 65) 1 D; 2 B

rJ

(p. 64) Author of text: James, P.D. (born 1920) Popular English thriller writer, born in Oxford. One of the new 'Queens of Crime'.

p~. 66-61 The origins of the detective Subjects of text:

stories.

Poe, Edgar Allan (1809-1849) American poet and story writer. He wrote highly original, weird, fantastic stories often dwelling on the macabre. Stories like 'Murders in the Rue Morgue', with original, intricate plots, are considered to have laid the pattern for the detective story.

Christie, Dame Agatha (1891-1979) Immensely popular British writer of detective fiction. Wrote brilliantly constructed plots with ingenious psychological twists. Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan (1859-1930) British author, best known as the creator of the detective, Sherlock Holmes. Born in Scotland and studied medicine at Edinburgh University. Said to have modelled deductive powers of Holmes on the Edinburgh surgeon Sir Joseph Bell, under whom Conan Doyle studied.

Cl

Expressions connected

with crime (p. 71)

1 b; 2 a; 3 a; 4 b; 5 a; 6 b; 7 b; 8 b; 9 a; 10 a

Exam...practic

A troubled

teenager

(p. 72)

1 B; 2 D; 3 A; 4 D; 5 D; 6 A Mrs Bixby (p. 73)

7 C; 8 C; 9 B; 10 D; 11 C; 12 D

e~eIO-PJIleutjpp,. 6..8fJ Types

Stranded in a cave (p. 73)

13 B; 14 D; 15 B; 16 B; 17 A; 18 C

of crime (p. 68)

1 libel; 2 forgery; 3 shoplifting; 4 arson; 5 manslaughter; 6 conspiracy; 7 trespass;

8 bribery

What exactly is music? (p. 74)

19 D; 20 D;

m 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Legal terms (p. 68) was sentenced to reached/returned a verdict fined (£200) for arrest (the man) for was/had been involved in banned (the man) from sue (her employers) for charged with

m

Adjective

m

Similar but different

A prizewinning

novel (p. 75)

21 B; 22 D A walk through the Scottish National Gallery (p. 76)

23 C; 24 D The antique dealer (p. 77)

25 D; 26 B

and noun collocations (p. 69)

1 besetting; 2 near; 3 marked; 4 foul; 5 spot; 6 ill-gotten; 7 rough; 8 put-up; 9 sharp; 10 funny

Part 3

(pp. 78-79) 27 H; 28 G; 29 E; 30 A; 31 F; 32 D; 33 C

Part 4 (p. 69)

(pp. 80-81) 34 A; 35 B; 36 C; 37 C; 38 D; 39 B; 40 D

1 eliminated; 2 recourse; 3 disposed; 4 slope; 5 fugitive; 6 slightest; 7 reprieved; 8 wave; 9 sentenced; 10 mounting; 11 loitering; 12 alleged

Il Prepositions

(p. 70)

1 under; 2 by; 3 up; 4 behind; 5 above; 6 for; 7 at; 8 on; 9 from; 10 in; 11 off; 12 out of

D Phrasal

p-p-, 82-83) verbs with

get (p.

70)

1 got round; 2 get (her) off; 3 getting up to; 4 got out of; 5 get along; 6 get at; 7 got down to; 8 get away with

fJ (p. 82)

m

m m

Similar but different (p. 71) 1 foul; 2 close; 3 shot; 4 pack; 5 blessing; 6 low; 7 rough; 8 sound; 9 large; 10 run

1 A; 2 C; 3 C; 4 A; 5 D; 6 C; 7 C; 8 B (pp. 82-83) 1 D; 2 D; 3 A; 4 C; 5 A; 6 C; 7 D; 8 D Intelligent

life in space? (p. 83)

1 B; 2 A; 3 C; 4 B; 5 D

Exam practice-: EatL

(p-p-.8 -85J

and pessimism (p. 84) 1 D; 2 B; 3 A; 4 C; 5 D; 6 A

Optimism

House-hunting (p. 84) 7 B; 8 C; 9 D; 10 C; 11 A; 12 B

Exam strategy: Part 2 (RQ.90-91)

Leadership qualities (p. 85) 13 B; 14 A; 15 C; 16 D; 17 B; 18 B

a

(p. 90)

2

m (p. a

Processes (p. 86)

1 g; 2 h; 3

e;

4 d; 5

c;

6

a;

7 b; 8 f

m

1 4 6 9

Adjective and noun collocations (p. 86) closed book; 2 necessary evil; 3 bitter pill; knotty problem; 5 impassioned plea; prime suspect; 7 blind alley; 8 graphic detail; acid test; 10 burning question

m

(p. 91) 1 Question 2; 2 Question 1

ExatlLPJactice: Part 2 (pp.~2.::.95J My mother

(p. 92)

1 A; 2 B

m

Similar but different (p. 8ll 1 proximity; 2 infancy; 3 threw; 4 cut; 5 oversee; 6 impervious; 7 principle; 8 set about; 9 tinkering; 10 allied

m

Verb and noun collocations (p. 8ll 1 e; 2 i; 3 a; 4 g; 5 b; 6 j; 7 f; 8 d; 9 c; 10 h

o

Phrasal verbs with put (p. 88) 1 put down to; 2 put across; 3 put in for; 4 put aside; 5 put up with; 6 put back; 7 put (it) to; 8 putting (him) down; 9 put forward; 10 put (him) down as

o

Idioms and expressions with put (p. 88) put paid to put the record straight are putting out feelers put the new recruit through his paces put in an appearance put down roots put all the other students in the shade was put off the scent put me through the mill 10 put me in the picture

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

m

91)

1 A; 2 D

Prepositions (p. 89)

1 on; 2 for; 3 from, to; 4 on; 5 in; 6 for; 7 about; 8 in

GI Expressions

and idioms (p. 89)

1 sweep; 2 point; 3 poke; 4 hand; 6 blue; 7 dumps; 8 moon

5 world;

Is Prince William related to Shakespeare? Subject of text:

(p. 93)

Shakespeare, William (1564-1616) English playwright, poet, actor. Born in Stratford upon Avon. Went to London as a young man and spent the next 25 years there as an actor and playwright. He wrote poetry, including 154 sonnets, which are considered among the world's finest. Many attempts have been made to identify the mysterious people who appear in them, such as 'The Dark Lady'.

Rembrandt SA; 6 C

(p. 94)

A portrait (p. 95)

7 C; 8A

\Jocabutary, de,-,-eloprnerJi (pp_. 96- 19)

a

Idioms with comparisons (p. 96) 1 a post; 2 a bat; 3 a coot; 4 a hatter; 5 a mouse; 6 life; 7 sin; 8 toast; 9 a sheet; 10 rain; 11 houses; 12 the hills; 13 Punch; 14 a cucumber; 15 a whistle; 16 chalk and cheese; 17 a fiddle; 18 a daisy; 19 crystal; 20 a new pin

m

Expressions with parts of the body (p. 96) 1 head; 2 hand; 3 neck; 4 heel; 5 back; 6 bone; 7 hair; 8 foot; 9 finger; 10 face

B Similar

but different

(p. 97)

1 tried; 2 cling; 3 hand; 4 indifferent; 5 found; 6 foreign; 7 competent; 8 frame; 9 Considering; 10 hinted

VocabuJar de'JeLo-pmeJJtlP-P_. 10~10JJ

rJ

Parts of the body (1) (p. 104)

1 skull; 2 collarbone; 5 heart; 6 kidneys

m

Adjective and noun collocations (p. 97> 1 wishful thinking; 2 a mixed blessing; 3 a raw deal; 4 second nature; 5 an olive branch; 6 a far cry; 7 rose-coloured spectacles; 8 a sweeping statement

o

m

Parts of the body (2) (p. 104)

1 vital organs; 2 gland; 3 joints; 4 liver; 5 bladder; 6 womb; 7 veins; 8 tendon; 9 spine; 10 intestine

Phrasal verbs with look (p. 98> 1 look to; 2 look out; 3 look into; 4 looked down on; 5 looked over; 6 look in on; 7 looked on; 8 look up to

B Expressions

D Expressions

m

with look (p. 98> 1 look before you leap 2 looked him up and down 3 looked daggers at her 4 looks down her nose at her husband's family 5 look a gift horse in the mouth 6 look on the bright side 7 look the worse for wear 8 look to his laurels

m

with parts of the body (p. 105) 1 b; 2 b; 3 a; 4 b; 5 a; 6 b; 7 a; 8 b; 9 b; 10 a

1

Expressions with finger (p. 105)

e;

2

a;

1 about; 2 at; 3 with; 4 about; 5 of; 6 on; 7 at; 8 to; 9 with; 10 on

Cl

Expressions and idioms with the weather (p. 99) 1 cast; 2 head; 3 rainy; 4 storm; 5 took; 6 wind; 7 heavy; 8 under; 9 wind; 10 weather

3

c;

4 f; 5 d; 6 b

o

Phrasal verbs with make (p. 106) 1 make up; 2 makes up for; 3 made out; 4 made for; 5 made off with; 6 made off; 7 make out; 8 he was making (it) up

D Similar Prepositions (p. 99)

3 ribs; 4 lungs;

but different

(p. 106)

1 up; 2 on; 3 loath; 4 on; 5 to; 6 on; 7 under; 8 to; 9 with; 10 on; 11 in; 12 on

m

Verbs (p. 107) 1 summon; 2 gobbled; 3 put; 4 whip; 5 take; 6 gave; 7 foisted; 8 equate; 9 cling; 10 thwarted

Cl

Similar words (p. 107> 1 a; 2 b; 3 a; 4 b; 5 b; 6 a; 7 b; 8 b

Exam strate9)!:

rJ (p.

art 3 lpp_.J1l0-101J Exam strate-9y.: Part 4 (PR. 108-10...(1)

100>

1 E; 2 B; 3 A; 4 C

rJ

(p. 108)

m

1 2 3 4

arguably; b indisputably implied; b stated can provoke; b invariably provokes It may be that; b It is a fact that

(p. 101>

Paragraph D is not needed.

a a a a

m

(pp. 108-109)

1 D; 2 B; 3 C; 4 C

Exam praclice:-.2arliLCpp Mobile

110- 11)

phones

m

More expressions with make and do (p. 115) 1 make; 2 do; 3 make; 4 make; 5 made; 6 do; 7 make; 8 make; 9 do; 10 made

1 A; 2 A; 3 D; 4 C; 5 C; 6 B; 7 A UNIT

m

~ Descriptive

adjectives (p. 112)

a 1 blunt; 2 tarnished; 3 tattered; 5 tangled; 6 shattered; 7 faded; 9 dented; 10 ripped

4 chipped; 8 warped;

b 1 was dented/shattered; 2 tarnished; 4 were shattered; 5 ripped; 6 blunt; 8 fading

(pp.Jt6-ll7J

m

(p. 116) 1 b; 2 b; 3 a; 4 a; 5 b; 6 b; 7 b; 8 b

3 chip; 7 warped;

m

(p. 116)

1 near; 2 good; 3 not; 4 full; 5 foreseeable; 6 Roughly; 7 standards; 8 low

m

Phrasal verbs with give (p. 113) 1 gave out; 2 give off; 3 had given away; 4 given (so much) of; 5 given over to; 6 give up; 7 give in; 8 given up on

Ii The

Ii Components,

Exal1LpractLce: Part 1 (p_p 1t8-119J

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

m

headboard hardboard protractor sieve shutter spanner screwdriver hinge

tools and equipment

Topic: Topic: Topic: Topic: Topic: Topic: Topic: Topic:

Similar but different

(p. 113)

electrics computers gardening cycling telephoning driving cooking photography

robots are coming (p. 117) 1 C; 2 D; 3 A; 4 C; 5 B; 6 D

A magazine

editor (p. 118)

1 B; 2 C; 3 A; 4 D; 5 C; 6 B The snakeman (p. 119) 7 C; 8 B; 9 A; 10 D;

11 C; 12 A

The survivors (p. 119) 13 C; 14 B; 15 D; 16 A; 17 B; 18 D

(p. 113)

1 accordance; 2 folding; 3 tapered off; 4 brand; 5 call; 6 power; 7 peak; 8 sets

Vocab_ulary,development (pp. 120-123)

o

m

1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10

o

Expressions with give (p. 114) is given to gave the game away to give him his due gives me the creeps give them a run for their money give the lie to (rumours that the company is on the rocks) gives them the edge over gave vent to have given rise to gave me the slip

Similar words (p. 115) 1 b; 2 a; 3 a; 4 a; 5 a; 6 b; 7 b; 8 a

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10

11 12 13 14 15

m

Expressions with time (p. 120) from time to time there's no time like the present at the best of times for the time being keep up with the times pressed for time in your own good time am killing time in the nick of time time will tell play for time in no time behind the times is doing/did/has done time time after time

Phrases with turn (p. 120) 1 i; 2 c; 3 j; 4 b; 5 a; 6 f; 7 e; 8 g; 9 h; 10 d

B Phrasal 1 4 6 9

turned turned turned turned

verbs with turn (p. 121)

on; 2 turned out of; 3 turned (me) off; (the boy) over; 5 turned against; (him) down; 7 turned up; 8 turn to; into; 10 turned away from

I:J Verb

and noun collocations (p. 121)

Please continue to hold (p. 128> 5 C; 6 B Mobile phones - curse or blessing? (p. 129) 7 C; 8 C

rJ

IJ Expressions

m

and idioms (p. 122)

1 run riot; 2 taken a toll on; 3 bury the hatchet; 4 clear the air; 5 blow her top; 6 carry the can; 7 get a grip; 8 has drawn a blank; 9 feel the pinch; 10 weather the storm

D Fixed

phrases and idioms (p. 123) 1 figment; 2 verge; 3 clue; 4 parcel; 5 sour; 6 wildest; 7 scared; 8 gist; 9 between; 10 chew

deveJopmeot (pp. 130:: 33J

Voc.abular

1 picking holes in the scheme; 2 kicked up a fuss; 3 raised the roof; 4 stick to your guns; 5 take sides; 6 pass the buck; 7 missed the boat; 8 sit on the fence; 9 hit the headlines; 10 pull her punches

Verb and noun collocations (p. 130) 1 h; 2 e; 3 b; 4 a; 5 g; 6 d; 7 f; 8 c

Expressions (p. 130) changed his tune met her match serves you right take your pick pulling their weight have taken leave of her senses earned his keep driving me mad call his bluff 10 follow in his footsteps

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

iii Prepositions

(p. 123) 1 above; 2 out; 3 on; 4 up; 5 on; 6 out; 7 around; 8 in; 9 on; 10 in

B Phrasal

verbs (p. 131> get through to; 2 mulled over; 3 jack in; rake up; 5 happen on/upon; 6 bring out; conned me into buying the car; 8 picked up on; iron out; 10 happened on/upon; 11 beef up; 12 have blown up; 13 is on to; 14 were borne out

1 4 7 9

I:J Describing

ways of speaking and looking

(pp. 131-132)

a

Exam strategy.: e.ar.L2-Cpp. 12~-25)

Ways of speaking: bark, drone, gasp, sob, twitter Ways of looking: beam, gape, grimace, pout, scowl

m (p.

b 1 sobbed; 2 gape; 3 beamed; 4 twittering; 5 barked; 6 gasped; 7 grimaced; 8 droned; 9 scowled; 10 pouted

124)

It was written for people who want to lost weight. The purpose of the text is to persuade.

B (p.

124)

IJ Verbs

of movement (p. 13 2) 1 bounce; 2 sag; 3 glided; 4 floated; 5 rotated; 6 pivots; 7 tilt; 8 adjust

1 b; 2 c; 3 a

I:J (p. 125) 1 C; 2 A

D Computer

ExallLPlactice: ~art Electrical appliances (p. 126) 1 B; 2 B An ergonomic

3 D; 4D

screen (p. 127>

(p.p.. 2.6-12.9

parts (p. 132)

1 monitor; 2 speaker; 3 keyboard; 4 mouse; 5 disk drive

iii Prepositions

(p. 133)

1 on; 2 up; 3 into; 4 off; 5 to; 6 at; 7 on; 8 up; 9 on; 10 with

m

Ii Expressions

Similar words Cp. 133)

1 a; 2 a; 3 a; 4 b; 5 b; 6 b; 7 b; 8 a

Exam strate-9Y-:Part3 (P-n. 134-135J

rub it in call it quits has (got) several irons in the fire what makes her tick play it by ear like it or lump it it makes no odds hit it off It beats me 10 it's back to the drawing board

m

rJ

Cp. 134) 1 C; 2 E; 3 A; 4 B

Cp. 140)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Adjectives Cp. 141)

a

1 g; 2 h; 3 i; 4 f; 5 b; 6 j;

ExamjJlactice:-.Ear13

(p-p. 136-13.1

b 1 tortuous; 2 tempting; 3 breezy; 4 promiscuous; 5 pointless; 6 flawed; 7 risible; 8 irresistible; 9 listless; 10 sloppy

m

Verb phrases Cp. 141)

rJ

Cp. 142)

1 spells; 2 tampered; 6 catch

rJ

Prepositions Cp. 138)

1 on/in; 2 from; 3 off; 4 for; 5 for; 6 on; 7 to; 8 with; 9 for; 10 with; 11 on; 12 off; 13 on; 14 on

m

Similar but different

Cp. 138)

1 other; 2 lends; 3 plead; 4 rate; 5 influence; 6 threw; 7 incited; 8 suppress

lit Phrasal

verbs with lay and set Cp. 139) 1 set her off; 2 laid down; 3 laid into me; 4 layoff; 5 lay this problem on you; 6 setting about; 7 laid off; 8 set back; 9 set to; 10 set aside

m

2

lit

Cp.142)

B Common

idioms and expressions Cp. 139)

1 disguise; 2 blot; 7 stone; 8 tip

3 drop; 4 gift; 5 tower; 6 pack;

m

Cp. 143)

1 C; 2 D

o

Similar words Cp. 140)

1 2 3 4 5 6

except; b but for In the light of; b On account of assuming; b considering in view of; b in case at the behest of; b on the part of thereby; b whereby

a a a a a a

7 e; 8 a; 9 d; 10 c

3 bear; 4 make; 5 take;

a 1 g; 2 i; 3 h; 4 f; 5 e; 6 d; 7 b; 8 c; 9 a;

10 j

b 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

settled their differences has a crush on set the world alight come in handy Buoyed up pricked up my ears bitten off more than he/she can chew jumped at the chance was not cut out for 10 to give him/her his/her due

Collocations (p. 147) 1 f; 2 g; 3 j; 4 e; 5 b; 6 h; 7 d; 8 a; 9 i; 10 c

Ordeal in the Highlands (p. 150> 1 C; 2 B; 3 D; 4 A; 5 B; 6 D Stress at work (p. 150> 7 D; 8 B; 9 A; 10 B; 11 D;

Hector Berlioz (p. 151) 13 D; 14 C; 15 A; 16 B; 17 A; 18 D

Unidentified

Flying Objects (p. 152)

19 C; 20 C On-line auctions (p. 153) 21 B; 22 C Genetically modified 23 C; 24 B

Similar but different

(p. 147)

1 driven; 2 pace; 3 within; 4 scale; 5 buoyed; 6 outcome; 7 prevalent; 8 sophisticated; 9 borrow; 10 hold

Expressions (p. 148)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

swim with the tide brought it home to me have broken new ground burning the midnight oil cut no ice with to do the spadework go by the board have no truck with

I] Colours

(p. 148) 1 blue; 2 black; 3 red; 4 black; 5 red; 6 green; 7 blue; 8 green

I] Phrasal 1 3 6 8

verbs with bring (p. 149) brought out; 2 brought (Sam and Ella) together; bring up; 4 brought about; 5 brings back; brought down; 7 has been brought back; brought off

iii Prepositions

(p. 149) 1 on; 2 to; 3 in; 4 on; 5 in; 6 on; 7 in; 8 along; 9 through; 10 down

12 C

Hibernation (p. 155) 25 C; 26 A

crops (p. 154)

Progress Tests: An~wer I


Progress Test 1 (Units 1-4) 1 A; 2

10 C; 18 B; 25 D; 32 D; 39 C;

c;

3

c;

4 B; 5 D;

6 A; 7 A; 8 A; 9 D;

11 B; 12 C; 13 C; 14 C; 15 C; 16 A; 17 D; 19 C; 20 B; 21 A; 22 C; 23 B; 24 C; 26 D; 27 C; 28 D; 29 B; 30 A; 31 B; 33 B; 34 A; 35 C; 36 B; 37 A; 38 B; 40 A; 41 C; 42 D; 43 A; 44 A; 45 A

1 C; 2 A; 3 C; 4 D; 5 D; 6 B; 7 B; 8 A; 9 B; 10 A; 11 B; 12 A; 13 B; 14 D; 15 A; 16 C; 17 B; 18 B; 19 D; 20 C; 21 A; 22 A; 23 C; 24 D; 25 A; 26 C; 27 D; 28 A; 29 D; 30 A; 31 A; 32 C; 33 C; 34 D; 35 B; 36 D; 37 B; 38 D; 39 A; 40 A; 41 C; 42 D; 43 D; 44 B; 45 A

1 D;

10 D; 17 B; 24 B; 31 B; 38 D; 45 D

2 B; 3 A; 4 C; 5 B; 6 B; 7 C; 8 A; 9 B;

11 A; 12 C; 13 A; 14 D; 15 D; 16 C; 18 A; 19 B; 20 C; 21 D; 22 D; 23 A; 25 A; 26 C; 27 D; 28 D; 29 B; 30 C; 32 C; 33 A; 34 A; 35 A; 36 C; 37 A; 39 C; 40 B; 41 C; 42 A; 43 D; 44 C;

1 A; 2 B; 3 A; 4 A; 5 A; 6 C; 7 D; 8 B; 9 B;

10 D; 18 D; 25 C; 32 D; 39 A;

11 C; 12 B; 13 A; 14 B; 15 B; 16 C; 17 C; 19 A; 20 B; 21 C; 22 C; 23 D; 24 B; 26 C; 27 C; 28 D; 29 B; 30 C; 31 B; 33 D; 34 B; 35 C; 36 B; 37 C; 38 B; 40 D; 41 B; 42 A; 43 D; 44 C; 45 D

UNIVERSITY of CAMBRIDGE

Local Examinations Syndicate IJ

---, - ----

Candidate Name If not already printed, in CAPITALS and co Candidate No. gri

write name

o ~~~~ ~~~~ ~~~~

Supervisor: If the candidate

is

ABSENT

or has

WITHDRAWN

shade here

;L, ;!..."'.!..:J ;L,

=

~~~~ ~~~~

Instructions Use a PENCIL (B or HB). Mark ONE letter only for each question. For example, if you think B is the right answer, mark your answer sheet like this: ~

~B ~

~

=C ~

Rub out any answer you wish to change using an eraser.

Part 1 A

Part 2 B

1 = A 2 =

=

A 3 =

=

A 4 = A 5 = A 6 = A 7 = A 8 = A 9 = A 10 = A 11 = A 12 = A 13 = A 14 = A 15 = A 16 = A 17 = A 18 =

•CPE 1

= B

B B

= B

= B

= B

= B

= B

=

B

= B

= B

= B

= B

= B

= B

= B

= B

=

C

= C

= C = C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

=

D

= D

= D = D

= D

= D

= D

= D

= D

A

19 = A 20 = A 21 = A 22 = A 23 = A 24 = A 25 = A 26 =

Part 4 B

= B

= B

= B

= B

= B

=

B

= B

=

C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

=

D

A 34 = A 35 =

= D

= D =

B

= B

=

A 36 = A 37 =

D

= D

B

= B

=

A 38 = A 39 =

= D

= D

B

= B

=

A 40 =

=

B

=

C

= C

=

C

= C

= C

= C

= C

=

D

= D

=

D

= D

= D

= D

=

D

=

D

=

= D

= D = D

= D

= D

= D

= D

= D

=

Part 3 A 27 = A 28 = A 29 = A 30 = A 31 = A 32 = A 33 =

B

= B

= B

= B

= B

= B

= B

=

C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

= C

=

D

= D

= D

= D

= D

= D

= D

=

E

= E

= E

=

E

= E

= E

= E

=

F

= F

= F

= F

= F

= F

= F

=

G

= G

= G

= G

= G

= G

= G

=

H

= H

= H

= H

= H

= H

= H

=

D

=

-

.

DP479/346

LONGMAN EXAM SKILLS New Proficiency Reading New Proficiency Reading will enable students to approach the Reading Paper of the Revised Cambridge Proficiency exam with complete confidence. A blend of reading skills and exam strategies gives students new insight into the interpretation of reading texts. Thorough and comprehensive coverage of key vocabulary areas together with extensive exam practice sections reinforces these exam preparation skills.

The New Proficiency

Reading Teacher/s Book includes:

T An overview of the Reading Paper in the Revised Cambridge Proficiency examination.

T The Answer Key, including useful notes on the texts in the Students' Book and their authors.

T Four photocopiable Progress Tests covering vocabulary from the Students' Book.

T The University of Cambridge sample answer sheet. Components: New Proficiency New Proficiency

.a. a'a -----

Reading Students' Book Reading Teacher's Book

~

IIIIIIIIW"

PEARSON

Longman

ISBN 0-582-45101-9 111111111111111111111I111111

NEW PROFICIENCY RE

RDING T8

111111111111111111111111 230.4882-1 , BOOKSHOP 1001080 123319)

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